Technology

  • February 22, 2024

    Invisalign Maker Beats Refusal-To-Deal Claims In 3Shape Row

    The makers of Invisalign beat an antitrust class action from orthodontists and aligner buyers Wednesday after a California federal judge ruled that the company's decision to terminate its interoperability agreement with a dental scanner company was at least partly made for "legitimate business reasons."

  • February 22, 2024

    Charter Argues For Tough IoT Security Authentication

    As the Federal Communications Commission prepares to vote next month on a "U.S. Cyber Trust Mark" for Internet of Things devices, cable giant Charter said the FCC should require that eligible devices maintain secure access controls.

  • February 22, 2024

    Biz Group Urges OECD Candidates To Back Digital Duties Ban

    The U.S. Council for International Business laid out its priorities for countries vying to be members of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, looking to garner support for a global moratorium on digital tariffs that is set to expire in a week.

  • February 22, 2024

    'Baffled' Judge Tells Attys Flo Health Case Isn't 'World War III'

    A California federal judge on Thursday blasted the parties in a proposed class action alleging that menstruation tracking app Flo Health impermissibly shares users' health information with Google and others, saying with their voluminous expert requests and "nitpicky" discovery letters, they're "litigating this case like it's World War III."

  • February 22, 2024

    FCC Dems Press Plan To Raise Broadband Speed Standards

    The Federal Communications Commission's Democratic majority will take another shot next month at raising the federal standard for broadband speeds, saying the existing minimums have lagged the private sector for too long.

  • February 22, 2024

    Apple Gets PTAB Wins On 2 Masimo Blood Oxygen Patents

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board has found that Apple has shown that most claims it challenged of two Masimo Corp. blood oxygen monitor patents are invalid, in the latest rulings in the wide-ranging patent dispute between the companies over the Apple Watch.

  • February 22, 2024

    AI Software Co. Hasn't Actually Developed AI, Suit Says

    Software and data engineering company Innodata Inc. has been hit with a proposed class action alleging its stock price dropped more than 30% after a financial research firm published a report saying its promised artificial intelligence technology is "smoke and mirrors" and that its marketing claims are like "putting lipstick on a pig."

  • February 22, 2024

    FTC Eyes 2024 Trial For Meta Antitrust Case

    The Federal Trade Commission told a D.C. federal court its case accusing Meta Platforms Inc. of monopolizing the personal social networking market could be ready for trial later this year, despite the company saying the case is too complex to start that soon.

  • February 22, 2024

    Mich. Judge OKs $52M Deal For Mayo Foundation Subscribers

    A Michigan federal judge on Wednesday gave the initial approval to a $52 million deal for subscribers to the Mayo Foundation's health magazine who allege the publisher shared their private information without consent.

  • February 22, 2024

    Google Says Worker's Poor Performance Dooms Age Bias Suit

    Google urged a Texas federal judge to grant it a pretrial win in a former sales manager's lawsuit alleging the company's push to replace older men with younger female workers cost him his job, saying the evidence shows he was cut loose for his poor performance.

  • February 22, 2024

    Google Deception Upended Free Markets, Texas-Led States Say

    A Texas-led coalition of states wants a federal court in the Lone Star State to preserve claims alleging Google broke state laws against deceptive trade practices, arguing the tech giant juiced profits for years by hiding changes to its advertising auction platform from users.

  • February 22, 2024

    Bumble Reaches $315K Settlement In Criminal Screening Case

    Dating app company Bumble has agreed to pay $315,000 and change its business practices to settle claims brought by New Jersey Attorney General Matthew Platkin that it failed to disclose its criminal background-check screening policies.

  • February 22, 2024

    Law Firm Scolded For 'Misbegotten' ChatGPT Use In Fees Bid

    A Manhattan federal judge criticized a special education-focused law firm Thursday for citing ChatGPT calculations to back up its attorney fee request of more than $100,000, calling the move "utterly and unusually unpersuasive."

  • February 22, 2024

    Former Kamala Harris Tech Adviser Joins DOJ As 1st AI Chief

    Faced with growing challenges involving artificial intelligence and cybersecurity, the U.S. Department of Justice on Thursday named a professor with ties to Vice President Kamala Harris as its first-ever adviser focused on these emerging technologies.

  • February 21, 2024

    Calif. Chamber Takes Privacy Regs Fight To State High Court

    The California Chamber of Commerce is pressing the state's Supreme Court to overturn a ruling that allows California's new data privacy agency to begin enforcing regulations it has finalized, arguing that there's "no way" state voters envisioned companies having less than a year to comply with the rules.  

  • February 21, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Told Sonos Ruling Treads On Patent Owners' Rights

    A consortium of patent lawyers and small startups are sounding the alarm at the Federal Circuit over a ruling last year from U.S. District Judge William Alsup that threw out a patent lawsuit from speaker maker Sonos for being too "sad," "ancient" and "wrong" to hold up in his court.

  • February 21, 2024

    Restaurant Software Co.'s $9M Investor Deal Gets 1st OK

    Shareholders in restaurant digital commerce software company Olo Inc. have received an initial green light for a $9 million deal to settle class action claims the company touted a soon-to-end partnership with fast-food chain Subway as an example of its success.

  • February 21, 2024

    FTC Says Twitter Staff Prevented Musk Violating Privacy Order

    The Federal Trade Commission told the House Judiciary Committee on Wednesday that were it not for Twitter employees disobeying Elon Musk's orders to grant some reporters "full access to everything ... no limits at all" to the social media platform's systems, the company may have violated a 2022 FTC consent decree.

  • February 21, 2024

    OCC's Hsu Floats Payments, PE 'Trip Wires' For FSOC Review

    The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency's acting chief sounded an alarm Wednesday about the growth of digital payments and private equity, saying federal regulators should consider setting numerical "trip wires" around those activities to stay ahead of potential financial stability risks.

  • February 21, 2024

    SEC Seeks $4M Damages Award In Sports Stock Fraud Suit

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission asked a D.C. federal judge on Wednesday to put the sports business Crystal World Holdings and others on the hook for more than $4.1 million in total damages for their alleged securities fraud.

  • February 21, 2024

    Intel Patent Trial Delayed To Allow Time For Counterclaim

    A California federal judge agreed on Tuesday to postpone the latest legal showdown between patent litigation business VLSI and chipmaker Intel after lawyers in the case acknowledged they couldn't reach agreement on the case schedule.

  • February 21, 2024

    Listing Services Say Zillow Is Weaponizing Antitrust Law

    A pair of regional multiple listing services have told an Arizona federal court that Zillow is trying to use antitrust law to kill competition for its ShowingTime service, which helps real estate agents and others manage property showings.

  • February 21, 2024

    'Cyber Trust Mark' Will Get Vote At Next FCC Meeting

    The proposed "U.S. Cyber Trust Mark" for "smart" products will come up for a vote at the Federal Communications Commission next month, FCC Chair Jessica Rosenworcel said Wednesday.

  • February 21, 2024

    Google Judge Slams Lack Of User Choice, Mulls Privacy Cert.

    A California federal judge on Wednesday appeared open to certifying a class of potentially tens of millions of Google account holders alleging Google's ad auction practices violate privacy rights, doubting that users consented to data-sharing if they couldn't opt out and telling Google's counsel, "there's no transparency and there's no choice."

  • February 21, 2024

    ByteDance Can't Arbitrate Ex-Coder's Wrongful Firing Suit

    A California federal judge declined to send a former ByteDance Inc. engineer's wrongful termination suit to arbitration, writing in a ruling made public Tuesday that there are factual disputes over whether he signed employment agreements containing arbitration clauses, saying the matter should be resolved via a jury trial.

Expert Analysis

  • The Double-Edged Sword Of Biometrics In Financial Services

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    Financial institutions are increasingly turning to biometrics for identity verification and fraud prevention, and while there are many benefits to such features, banks must remain vigilant against growing AI technologies that could make users' information vulnerable to biometrics hackers, say Elizabeth Roper at Baker McKenzie and Chris Allgrove at Ingenium Biometric Laboratories.

  • A Close Look At The FCC's Revised SIM Card Fraud Rules

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    Carolyn Mahoney and John Seiver at Davis Wright break down recently proposed revisions to the Federal Communications Commission's customer proprietary network information and local number portability rules for wireless providers, discuss the revisions' implications on artificial intelligence regulation, and provide tips to prevent SIM swap and port-out fraud.

  • What Retailers Should Note In Calif. Web Tracking Suits

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    As retailers face a deluge of class actions alleging the use of conventional web analytic tools violate wiretapping and eavesdropping provisions of the California Invasion of Privacy Act, uncovering the path toward a narrow interpretation of the law will largely depend on how these cases proceed, say Matthew Pearson and Kareem Salem at BakerHostetler.

  • Copyright Lessons Following Ruling In Artist AI Suit

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    The recent California district court ruling in Andersen v. Stability AI — that artists needed to specify how the training of artificial intelligence tools violated their copyrights — shows that lawyers on either side of generative AI matters must carefully navigate copyright issues including temporary copying and data sourcing, says Carlos Araya at Magnolia Abogados.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • Fed. Circ. In Jan.: One Word Can Affect Claim Construction

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    The Federal Circuit's recent Pacific Biosciences v. Personal Genomics decision highlights how even construction of a simple term can be dispositive, and thus disputed, in view of the specific context provided by the surrounding claim language, say Jeremiah Helm and Sean Murray at Knobbe.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • Following Banking Regulators' Breadcrumbs To 2024 Priorities

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    Through blog posts, speeches, and formal guidance and regulations, prudential and other federal and state financial regulators laid out a road map last year pointing to compliance priorities that should be reflected in financial institutions' planning this year, say Laurel Loomis Rimon and Gina Shabana at Jenner & Block.

  • UK Ruling Revitalizes Discussions On Harmonizing AI And IP

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    The U.K. Supreme Court's decision in Thaler v. Comptroller-General last month has reinvigorated ongoing discussions about how the developments in artificial intelligence fit within the existing intellectual property legislative landscape, illustrating that effective regulation will be critical as the value and influence of this sector grows, say Nick White and Olivia Gray at Charles Russell.

  • Directors And Officers Face Unique AI-Related Risks

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    As privacy, intellectual property and discrimination lawsuits focusing on artificial intelligence increase, corporate directors and officers must stay aware of associated risks, including those related to compliance, litigation and cybersecurity, says Jonathan Meer at Wilson Elser.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • New Strain Of Web Tracking Suits Pose Risks For Retailers

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    Amid an ongoing surge of California state and federal lawsuits that are using novel theories to allege companies used certain recording technologies to illegally track website users, retailers should take steps to develop a potential argument that customers consented to any alleged uses of these devices, say attorneys at Benesch.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • AI Takes Transformers Beyond Robots In Disguise

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    At the intersection of artificial intelligence and copyright law, the shape-shifting models known as transformers raise the question of whether using copyrighted materials to train such models constitutes a transformative use, says Sean Li at Benesch.

  • NC TikTok Order Holds Lessons On Handling State AG Probes

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    Earlier this month, a North Carolina appeals court compelled TikTok to give the state attorney general information relating to 98,000 recorded Zoom meetings, reminding companies that successful civil litigation strategies may have the opposite effect in the state or regulatory investigation context, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

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