Retail & E-Commerce

  • May 10, 2024

    Epic Judge Raises Eyebrows About Apple's New 27% App Fee

    The California federal judge overseeing Epic's antitrust case against Apple challenged the terms the tech giant is using to comply with her order to allow app developers to send users to outside payment platforms, saying Friday that Apple appears to be trying to maintain its past revenue with a new 27% fee.

  • May 10, 2024

    Starship Enterprise Finders Accuse Auction House Of Fraud

    A pair of friends who found the long-lost model of the USS Enterprise starship featured in the "Star Trek" TV series have accused a prominent auction house of cheating them out of hundreds of thousands of dollars by secretly negotiating a cheaper deal with the son of the series creator for publicity.

  • May 10, 2024

    Retail Group Opposes $1B Arbitral Award Against Walgreens

    An advocacy group for the retail industry is backing Walgreens as it looks to set aside a nearly $1 billion arbitral award in a dispute with a COVID test maker, telling a Delaware federal judge that judicial intervention is warranted in this case.

  • May 10, 2024

    Patent Owners Face Risks In Amazon Program After Ruling

    The Federal Circuit ruled earlier this month that a company alleging patent infringement through Amazon's patent evaluation program must face a declaratory judgment suit in the accused infringer's home state. The holding creates a risk for patent owners who may rethink using the program, attorneys told Law360.

  • May 10, 2024

    Pa. Man To Cop To Dick's Sporting Goods Insider Trading

    A Pennsylvania man intends to plead guilty to insider trading on Dick's Sporting Goods securities in which he made nearly $825,000 based on tips unwittingly passed to him from an acquaintance who worked for the retail chain, according to federal court filings.

  • May 10, 2024

    Zeekr's US Debut Could Spur More IPOs From China

    Electric-vehicle maker Zeekr's robust initial public offering sent an encouraging signal to Chinese companies considering whether to tap U.S. markets after a long lull, despite continued risks stemming from fractured U.S.-China relations, experts said Friday.

  • May 10, 2024

    Trade Court Lets Solar Duties Suit Proceed Over Feds' Protest

    U.S. solar panel manufacturers' suit over a two-year pause on new duties for competitors from four Southeast Asian countries survived the government's push for dismissal this week, with the trade court affirming its authority over the case.

  • May 10, 2024

    Walmart Must Pay $1M Injury Verdict, Ga. Appeals Court Says

    The Georgia Court of Appeals won't give Walmart a way out of a $1 million verdict owed to a woman injured in a store in 2018, dispatching Friday with the retail chain's argument that the verdict was blatantly excessive.

  • May 10, 2024

    NY Gov. Orders Shakeup Of Cannabis Regulatory Agency

    New York Gov. Kathy Hochul on Friday announced an overhaul of the state's embattled cannabis regulatory agency, unveiling an investigative audit that showed how "inexperienced" leaders "wasted valuable time and resources," and then declaring $5 million in one-time grants would be awarded to a select group of applicants who took a financial hit by the licensing delays.

  • May 10, 2024

    Nipple Covers Don't Stick To Body As Advertised, Suit Says

    Cakes Body LLC faces a putative class action filed Thursday in California federal court by a consumer who says the company falsely creates the impression that its reusable nipple covers function as alternatives to bras that adhere to the body, but that the product doesn't work as advertised. 

  • May 10, 2024

    Ex-Wayfair Web Designer Says Racism Forced Him Out

    A Black former Wayfair web designer says he faced a workplace "infused by racial discrimination" during his two years with the Boston-based online retailer and suffered retaliation when he complained, according to a suit filed Friday in Massachusetts state court.

  • May 10, 2024

    9th Circ. Splits PAGA Claims In Macy's Arbitration Fight

    Macy's can't compel arbitration of nonindividual claims in a worker's wage suit brought under California's Private Attorneys General Act, the Ninth Circuit ruled Friday, saying language in an arbitration pact prevents blending together different types of claims.

  • May 10, 2024

    JLM Couture Nears Settlement With Bridal Dress Designer

    Dressmaker JLM Couture told Delaware's bankruptcy court Friday it reached an agreement in principle with a bridal dress designer, who was sued by the company and had sought to convert its Chapter 11 case into a Chapter 7 liquidation.

  • May 10, 2024

    Guess? Sued To Stop Founders' Alleged Pending Equity Grab

    A pension fund stockholder of Guess? Inc. has sued the company, its founders, and its board in Delaware's Court of Chancery, alleging "a covert attempt to strip the company's public stockholders of their contractual right to equal treatment" in connection with a merger or sale of Guess.

  • May 10, 2024

    Dollar Tree Parent Sued Over Alleged Lead In Cinnamon

    Dollar Tree Inc.'s parent company and a New York family-owned food business were hit Thursday with a proposed class action in New York federal court alleging that the chain sold cinnamon that was contaminated with lead, following U.S. Food and Drug Administration recalls of lead-tainted cinnamon.

  • May 10, 2024

    Sam Ash Music Can Tap $20M DIP That Trustee Opposed

    Music store chain Sam Ash won a New Jersey bankruptcy court's blessing Friday to borrow $20 million in Chapter 11 financing, defeating an objection by the U.S. Trustee's Office to a mechanism that would let the funds be used to pay off existing debt held by the lender.

  • May 10, 2024

    Pepperidge Farm Drivers Not Employees, 3rd Circ. Affirms

    Three delivery drivers for Pepperidge Farm are independent contractors, not employees, and thus cannot sue the company for state wage and hour law violations, a Third Circuit panel ruled Friday, saying the drivers' daily responsibilities make it clear they are self-employed.

  • May 10, 2024

    NJ Attys Settle Malpractice Suit Over Wawa Injury Claim

    Attorneys at a New Jersey law firm have settled a malpractice lawsuit from a former client who claimed they caused him to lose his chance to sue convenience store chain Wawa over an on-the-job injury, according to a letter submitted Thursday to state court.

  • May 10, 2024

    Fuzzy Jurisdiction In Web Cases Has 1st Circ. Judge 'Worried'

    A First Circuit judge has said uncertainty over how personal jurisdiction rules apply to cases involving the borderless internet may require action from Congress or the U.S. Supreme Court, expressing concern that website operators can "manipulate" the legal requirement in order to avoid accountability.

  • May 10, 2024

    Feds Finalize Tariffs Topping 744% On 8 Countries' Mattresses

    The U.S. Department of Commerce firmed up anti-dumping duties reaching more than 744% on mattresses that are being dumped in the U.S., marking its third wave of sky-high tariffs on mattresses from abroad.

  • May 10, 2024

    Digital Platform Xtribe To Go Public Via $141M SPAC Merger

    Technology-driven marketplace company Xtribe PLC, advised by Cozen O'Connor PC, has announced plans to go public via a merger with Haynes and Boone LLP-led special-purpose acquisition company WinVest Acquisition Corp. in a deal that values Xtribe at an implied equity value of $141 million.

  • May 10, 2024

    Toymaker KidKraft Files Ch. 11 With Plan To Sell Assets

    Dallas toy company KidKraft Inc. filed for Chapter 11 protection in a Texas bankruptcy court Friday with more than $100 million in debt, blaming economic headwinds and saying it has a prepackaged sale plan.

  • May 09, 2024

    Amazon Shakes Wash. Suit Premised On Calif. Wiretap Claims

    A Washington federal judge has tossed a putative class action accusing Amazon.com Inc. of unlawfully recording chat conversations with consumers, finding that the plaintiff couldn't sustain a suit containing only California claims because the e-commerce giant's usage agreement makes clear that Washington law governs such disputes. 

  • May 09, 2024

    FTC Urges High Court To Reject Challenge To $5.2M Award

    The Federal Trade Commission has urged the U.S. Supreme Court to reject a credit monitoring company's challenge to a $5.2 million refund award the federal agency won on behalf of a class of consumers, arguing the award is authorized under the Federal Trade Commission Act. 

  • May 09, 2024

    Amazon, Walmart Face Dem Questions Over 'Dynamic Pricing'

    Senate Banking Committee Chair Sherrod Brown on Thursday raised concerns to Amazon and Walmart about corporations hiking prices by exploiting customer data and pricing algorithms, saying it undermines consumers' ability to comparison shop and save money.

Expert Analysis

  • 5th Circ. Clarifies What Is And Isn't A 'New Use' Of PFAS

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    The Fifth Circuit's March 21 decision in Inhance Technologies v. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, preventing the EPA from regulating existing uses of PFAS under "significant new use" provisions of the Toxic Substances Control Act, provides industry with much-needed clarity, say Joseph Schaeffer and Sloane Wildman at Babst Calland.

  • Handling Customer Complaints In Bank-Fintech Partnerships

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    As regulators mine consumer complaint databases for their next investigative targets, it is critical that fintech and bank partners adopt a well-defined and monitored process for ensuring proper complaint handling, including by demonstrating proficiency and following interagency guidance, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Trump's NY Civil Fraud Trial Spotlights Long-Criticized Law

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    A New York court’s recent decision holding former President Donald Trump liable for fraud brought old criticisms of the state law used against him back into the limelight — including its strikingly broad scope and its major departures from the traditional elements of common law fraud, say Mark Kelley and Lois Ahn at MoloLamken.

  • Opinion

    Requiring Leave To File Amicus Briefs Is A Bad Idea

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    A proposal to amend the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure that would require parties to get court permission before filing federal amicus briefs would eliminate the long-standing practice of consent filing and thereby make the process less open and democratic, says Lawrence Ebner at the Atlantic Legal Foundation and DRI Center.

  • 4 Ways To Motivate Junior Attorneys To Bring Their Best

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    As Gen Z and younger millennial attorneys increasingly express dissatisfaction with their work and head for the exits, the lawyers who manage them must understand and attend to their needs and priorities to boost engagement and increase retention, says Stacey Schwartz at Katten.

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Fears About The End Of Chevron Deference Are Overblown

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    While some are concerned about repercussions if the U.S. Supreme Court brings an end to Chevron deference in the Loper and Relentless cases this term, agencies and attorneys would survive just fine under the doctrines that have already begun to replace it, say Daniel Wolff and Henry Leung at Crowell & Moring.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • Unpacking The Complicated Question Of CIPA's Applicability

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    As the number of California Invasion of Privacy Act cases increases, more and more companies with little-to-no California presence are being hauled into California court, raising questions of when CIPA applies and to whom, says Matthew Pearson at BakerHostetler.

  • Stay Interviews Are Key To Retaining Legal Talent

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    Even as the economy shifts and layoffs continue, law firms still want to retain their top attorneys, and so-called stay interviews — informal conversations with employees to identify potential issues before they lead to turnover — can be a crucial tool for improving retention and morale, say Tina Cohen Nicol and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • Antitrust Ruling Shows Limits Of US Law's Global Reach

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    Antitrust plaintiffs often cite the legislative history of the Foreign Trade Antitrust Improvements Act to support application of U.S. antitrust law to alleged injuries abroad, but as a California federal court recognized recently in Figaro v. Apple, the cited history does no such thing, say Daniel Swanson and Eli Lazarus at Gibson Dunn.

  • What To Know About State-Level Health Data Privacy Laws

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    Companies that handle consumer health data, including those in the retail sector, should take a conservative approach when interpreting the scope of new health privacy laws in Washington, Nevada and Connecticut, which may include development of privacy notices, consent procedures, rights request response processes and processor contracts, say attorneys at Hunton.

  • Opinion

    Intoxicating Hemp Products: It's High Time For Clarity

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    Thanks to ambiguity in the 2018 Farm Bill, intoxicating hemp cannabinoid products are largely unregulated and are widely available without restrictions on who can buy the products, and although there are several possible solutions, voluntary industry action by good actors is the best option, say Andrew Kline and Tommy Tobin at Perkins Coie.

  • Take AG James' Suit Over Enviro Claims As A Warning

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    New York Attorney General Letitia James' recent suit against JBS USA Food Co. over allegedly misleading claims about its goal to reach net zero by 2040 indicates that challenges to green claims are likely to continue, and that companies should think twice about ignoring National Advertising Division recommendations, say attorneys at Kelley Drye.

  • Series

    Spray Painting Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experiences as an abstract spray paint artist have made me a better litigator, demonstrating — in more ways than one — how fluidity and flexibility are necessary parts of a successful legal practice, says Erick Sandlin at Bracewell.

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