Commercial

  • February 13, 2024

    Arizona Lawmakers Sue Feds Over Grand Canyon Monument

    The top Republicans in the Arizona Legislature and the state treasurer are asking a federal court to overturn President Joe Biden's protection of nearly a million acres in northern Arizona, calling his creation of the Baaj Nwaavjo I'tah Kukveni-Ancestral Footprints of the Grand Canyon National Monument an "unlawful land grab."

  • February 12, 2024

    Activists Ask Justices To Reverse Calif. Tribal Casino Approval

    An anti-casino advocacy group has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review a Ninth Circuit decision that upholds the dismissal of its suit, claiming the federal government erred when finding that the Ione Band of Miwok Indians is eligible to open a casino in California.

  • February 12, 2024

    WeWork Lenders Blast SoftBank, Ask For Ch. 11 Examiner

    An ad hoc group of WeWork noteholders have urged the bankruptcy court in New Jersey to appoint an examiner in the coworking space company's Chapter 11 proceedings, asserting that "things are not going as planned" due to "fundamental flaws" in the debtor's case and its ties to SoftBank.

  • February 12, 2024

    Judge Amends Camp Operator's $1M Surety Bond Order

    A federal district judge has agreed to modify a Montana campground operator's $1 million surety bond stay order pending an appeal to the Ninth Circuit, saying the company's proposed substitution of its projected net income for 2024 raises questions about its reported principal income.

  • February 12, 2024

    2 Firms Guide Carlyle Entity's $265M NYC Skyscraper Buy

    Real estate mogul Albert Kalimian has sold The Aire, a 43-story Manhattan skyscraper, to an affiliate of The Carlyle Group for $265 million in a deal shaped by Greenberg Traurig and Simpson Thacher.

  • February 12, 2024

    Flagstar Takes Aim At 'Nonsensical' $3M Signature Fraud Suit

    Flagstar Bank has urged a New York federal judge to toss a cash advance lender's suit that seeks millions of dollars allegedly stolen from its account at Signature Bank years before the bank failed, saying the theory that Flagstar should be on the hook for Signature's liabilities as its acquirer is "nonsensical."

  • February 12, 2024

    NYC Real Estate Heiress Calls Misconduct Claims A 'Fiction'

    An heiress of real estate mogul Sol Goldman's New York City real estate empire and other parties asked a New York state court to toss several claims made by family members who allege that she wrongfully seized total control of the family business.

  • February 12, 2024

    Ga. Attys Claim Fund Managers Organized Illegal Tax Shelter

    Managers of a fund profited by selling units in a "grossly inflated" tax shelter and then hid a federal criminal investigation into the arrangement from investors, partners in an Athens, Georgia, law firm said in a suit recently transferred to federal court.

  • February 12, 2024

    Customer Can Sue Closed Bowling Alley For Slip-And-Fall

    A Michigan appeals court won't spare the former operator of a Detroit-area bowling alley from a man's slip-and-fall lawsuit, saying she missed her opportunity to shutter her companies in such a way as to shorten the window when civil liability claims could be filed.

  • February 12, 2024

    Judge Refuses To Strip NYC Of Its XXX Business Zoning Laws

    A federal judge found the city of New York acted constitutionally in passing rules in 2001 that restricted where a category of adult entertainment purveyors could do business, in a long-running dispute brought by 19 companies arguing the legislation unfairly targets them.

  • February 12, 2024

    Ind. Seed Lab Property Exempt From Tax, Board Says

    An Indiana laboratory used to test seeds qualifies for a property tax exemption because it is used for scientific purposes and benefits the public, the state Board of Tax Review said.

  • February 12, 2024

    $1M Alcohol Spill Coverage Suit Not Federal Case, Co. Says

    A packaging company being sued by its insurer after expired alcoholic beverages seeped into a warehouse floor, causing more than $1 million in damage, told a Tennessee federal court it should toss the suit because it lacked jurisdiction.

  • February 12, 2024

    Barry McTiernan Signs Battery Park Plaza Lease

    Commercial real estate company Rudin said Monday that Barry McTiernan & Moore LLC will move its headquarters to the tower at One Battery Park Plaza in a deal that involved broker Cushman & Wakefield.

  • February 09, 2024

    Judge Refuses To Quash Subpoenas In Umpqua Bank Case

    A California federal judge has rejected a group of investors' effort to quash a series of subpoenas served by Umpqua Bank on third parties, ruling that the investors lacked merit in their opposition and that the bank adhered to the rules of discovery.

  • February 09, 2024

    Pike Place TM Suit Dismissed Following Seattle Settlement

    A Washington judge tossed a trademark infringement case between a popular Seattle fish stand and its landlord after the two parties came to a settlement agreement over claims that the stand had infringed the "Pike Place" mark through the sale of packaged smoked salmon.

  • February 09, 2024

    Fruit Of The Loom Entity Seeks Pay For Sports Complex Work

    Fruit of the Loom subsidiary Russell Brands LLC said it's owed $256,000 for its work on the construction of an Ohio sports complex, telling an Ohio federal court that the builder, property owner and surety have failed to tender payment nearly a year after the work was completed.

  • February 09, 2024

    Judges Pour Cold Water On Homeowner's Sprinkler Suit

    A lower court was correct in finding that a homeowner can't prove adverse possession of disputed property because he hasn't lived in the home long enough, a Michigan Court of Appeals panel said.

  • February 09, 2024

    Cushman Doesn't Pay Workers On Time, Suit Says

    A former Cushman & Wakefield employee accused the real estate services firm of not paying him on time in New York federal court this week.

  • February 09, 2024

    6th Circ. Says Fed. Court Can't Hear $420K Tax Lien Case

    Federal law prevents an Ohio company from suing county tax assessors in Ohio federal court over whether the company owes more than $420,000 in back property taxes, a Sixth Circuit panel ruled.

  • February 09, 2024

    3 Firms Guide $91M In Loans For Vacant Brooklyn Land

    An LLC affiliated with Artimus Construction Inc. has finalized nearly $91 million in mortgage loans for a property in Brooklyn, New York, in deals advised by Sidley Austin LLP, Troutman Pepper Hamilton Sanders LLP and Windels Marx, according to official records released Friday.

  • February 09, 2024

    Property Plays: MCR, Black Spruce, Willow Bridge

    MCR has landed $333 million in refinancing for a multistate hotel portfolio, Black Spruce Management has scored $146 million in financing for a Manhattan multifamily property, and Willow Bridge Property has landed $175 million in financing for three multifamily properties.

  • February 02, 2024

    NJ Borough Says It Didn't Block Paint Factory Redevelopment

    A New Jersey borough denied claims made by two companies that it wrongfully stopped them from buying and redeveloping a former paint factory by adopting an opposing redevelopment plan and ordinance.

  • February 09, 2024

    Groups Claim NYC Hospital Closing To Liquidate Real Estate

    A community group, tenants associations and other organizations claimed in New York state court that the Mount Sinai Health System's unapproved and "grossly deficient" closure and service reduction plans for Mount Sinai Beth Israel Hospital are attempts to profit from "very, very valuable" Manhattan real estate.

  • February 09, 2024

    Atlanta Atty Keeps $1.15M Fee Award Despite Tossing Notes

    A Georgia state appellate court has upheld an award of $1.15 million in attorney fees to a solo-practice attorney, saying an Atlanta-based airport travel spa operator he did work for failed to show the trial court was wrong in finding the attorney didn't have to save notes about the legal services he provided.

  • February 09, 2024

    DLA Piper Adds Former McDermott Partner In DC

    A former McDermott Will & Emery LLP partner who advises financial services firms has jumped to DLA Piper in Washington, D.C., after more than two years with his previous firm.

Expert Analysis

  • In-Office Engagement Is Essential To Associate Development

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    As law firms develop return-to-office policies that allow hybrid work arrangements, they should incorporate the specific types of in-person engagement likely to help associates develop attributes common among successful firm leaders, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Shifts In The CRE Landscape Demand Creative Loan Solutions

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    An increase in commercial real estate loan workouts makes it critical for borrowers, lenders and other CRE participants to examine all the available options and remedies, including mortgage and mezzanine foreclosures, bankruptcy filings and property short sales, say attorneys at Goulston & Storrs.

  • How To Recognize And Recover From Lawyer Loneliness

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    Law can be one of the loneliest professions, but there are practical steps that attorneys and their managers can take to help themselves and their peers improve their emotional health, strengthen their social bonds and protect their performance, says psychologist and attorney Traci Cipriano.

  • A Smoother Process For CRE Receiverships In Conn.

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    A newly effective Connecticut law concerning distressed commercial real estate provides a number of opportunities and strategic considerations for creditors, and should be watched even by counsel in other states as adoption of the law could become more widespread, say John Loughnane and Steven Coury at White and Williams.

  • What Came Of Texas Legislature's Long-Promised Tax Relief

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    Following promises of historic tax relief made possible by a record budget surplus, the Texas legislative session as a whole was one in which taxpayers that are large businesses could have done somewhat better, but the new legislation is clearly still a positive, say attorneys at Baker Botts.

  • CRE Guidance Helps Lenders Work With Struggling Borrowers

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    In recognition of growing troubles with commercial real estate loans, four federal regulators' recently updated loan accommodations guidance provides a helpful framework for approaching loan workouts without the punitive results of adverse classifications, say Jaclyn Grodin and Muryum Khalid at Goulston & Storrs.

  • NYC Cannabis Landlord Accountability Law Has Limitations

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    A recently passed bill in New York City, aiming to crack down on the illegal cannabis market by levying fines against landlords who knowingly lease to unlicensed sellers, contains loopholes that may potentially limit the bill’s impact and lead to unintended consequences, say attorneys at Falcon Rappaport.

  • When Investment Banks Can Sell Real Estate In Calif.

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    When investment banks sell businesses that own property in California, they may run into trouble if they are not licensed real estate brokers, unless the property is merely incidental to the deal at hand, say attorneys at Holland & Knight.

  • Hedging Variable Interest Rates In A Volatile Market

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    Variable rate loans, which were an advantageous borrowing method prior to the recent Federal Reserve rate hikes and subsequent volatility, are now the difference between borrowers remaining current on their obligations and defaulting due to the sharply increasing debt service requirements of their loans, say attorneys at Cassin & Cassin.

  • Parsing FTC's Intercontinental-Black Knight Merger Challenge

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    The Federal Trade Commission's recent Article III case challenging a merger between Intercontinental Exchange and Black Knight suggests the agency is using a structuralist approach to evaluate the merger's potential anti-competitive harm, says David Evans at Kelley Drye.

  • Mallory Gives Plaintiffs A Better Shot At Justice

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    Critics of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Mallory v. Norfolk Southern claim it opens the door to litigation tourism, but the ruling simply gives plaintiffs more options — enabling them to seek justice against major corporations in the best possible court, say Rayna Kessler and Ethan Seidenberg at Robins Kaplan.

  • Effectual Relief Questions Linger After Section 363 Ruling

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    In the months since the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in MOAC Mall Holdings, courts and practitioners must grapple with the issue of what effectual relief courts may grant upon an appeal of an unstayed sale order, says Monique Jewett-Brewster at Hopkins Carley.

  • Courts Can Overturn Deficient State Regulations, Too

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    While suits challenging federal regulations have become commonplace, such cases against state agencies are virtually nonexistent, but many states have provisions that allow litigants to bring suit for regulations with inadequate cost-benefit analyses, says Reeve Bull at the Virginia Office of Regulatory Management.