Courts

  • Ga. Judicial Watchdog Wants Probate Judge Ousted

    The long-running trial of a Georgia probate judge accused of violating the state's Code of Judicial Conduct on social media and jailing a woman seeking to amend her marriage record wrapped Thursday, with the head of the state's judicial watchdog arguing she should be removed from the bench.

  • Baltimore Judge To Face Hearing Over Claims He Groped Atty

    A Baltimore city district court judge is set to face a judicial ethics hearing in May over allegations that he repeatedly touched a lawyer without her consent following a bar association event, while he apologized for making the woman uncomfortable and said he genuinely thought she had been flirting with him.

  • 11th Circ. Says Ex-USF Law Prof. Can't Sue Without A Lawyer

    The Eleventh Circuit upheld on Thursday a lower court's order barring a former University of South Florida law professor from filing additional cases against her former employer without another attorney's signature, finding nothing wrong with the district court controlling its docket in the face of her repeated lawsuits.

  • 1st Amendment Limited In Court, Prosecutor Tells 6th Circ.

    The First Amendment "is not without limit in a courtroom setting," says a Michigan county prosecutor who is trying to convince the Sixth Circuit not to disturb a ruling that upholds the state's prohibition on recording livestreaming court proceedings.

  • Doctor In NBA Fraud Case Can Ditch Atty Over Plea Squabble

    A Seattle physician accused of taking part in a healthcare fraud scheme orchestrated by former NBA players may drop his court-appointed attorney and represent himself in the New York criminal trial, a federal judge in Manhattan ordered, approving the move after the doctor claimed the lawyer refused to withdraw his guilty plea.

  • Judicial Nominee Assures GOP Sens. She's Not A Marxist

    Republicans on the Senate Judiciary Committee raised concerns about two U.S. district court nominees appearing before the committee on Thursday over their supposed ties to Marxism and the defund the police campaign, but the nominees tried to disabuse lawmakers of that suggestion.

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    NJ Superior Court Hopefuls Greenlighted By Senate Panel

    The New Jersey Senate's Judiciary Committee on Thursday advanced three nominees for the short-staffed state Superior Court who have served in local government and approved the formal nomination of Essex County's acting prosecutor of six years.

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    Ex-NJ Judge Suspended From Law Practice Over Groping

    The New Jersey Supreme Court handed down a one-year suspension from practicing law to a former North Bergen municipal court judge who was previously permanently barred from being a judge for groping a woman and being dishonest about the incident in the judicial ethics case against him.

  • Ga. DA Moves To Quash Trump Co-Defendant Subpoenas

    Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis has moved to quash subpoenas that would require her, members of her staff and the attorney who represented special prosecutor Nathan Wade in his divorce to testify during a hearing on whether she should be disqualified from prosecuting the Georgia election interference case.

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    Justices Doubtful Of States' Power To DQ Trump

    U.S. Supreme Court justices were deeply skeptical Thursday that states have the authority to bar Donald Trump from the ballot under the 14th Amendment, repeatedly questioning why Colorado should be allowed to potentially decide the course of the 2024 presidential election.

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    High Court Sides With Whistleblower Against UBS

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday found that whistleblowers don't need to show retaliatory intent on the part of their employers in order to be protected under federal law, in a unanimous ruling in favor of a former UBS employee and whistleblower who fought to restore a $900,000 jury verdict he secured in 2017.

  • Justices Rule Gov't Agencies Not Immune From FCRA Suits

    The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Thursday that a person can sue a government agency under the Fair Credit Reporting Act, because the law's 1970 definition of a "person" was sufficient to waive the government's immunity.

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    Judge Newman's Options Dwindle After Suspension Is Upheld

    Following Wednesday's decision by the national panel that reviews judicial misconduct cases upholding Federal Circuit Judge Pauline Newman's suspension, she faces a difficult path to getting reinstated without complying with an investigation into her mental fitness, experts say.

  • Fla. Ex-Judge Seeks Lighter Penalty Over Inflated Finances

    A former Florida county court judge urged the state's high court on Wednesday to impose a minimum one-year rehabilitative suspension for inflating campaign finances rather than disbarment, arguing that other attorneys have received lighter punishments under comparable circumstances.

  • GOP Sens. Probe 3rd Circ. Pick's Ties To Rutgers Program

    Republicans on the Senate Judiciary Committee are looking into a Rutgers Law School program at the center of their objections to the president's nominee for the Third Circuit, who would be the first Muslim federal appeals court judge if confirmed.

  • Ill. Atty's Conviction Over Embezzlement Scheme Sticks

    A former attorney who cried "wolf" over the government preventing him from adequately preparing for trial cannot unwind his conviction for misappropriating a now-shuttered bank's embezzled funds and lying about his assets, an Illinois federal judge ruled Tuesday.

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    Jackson Walker Steps Down From 4E Ch. 11 Amid Fees Probe

    Jackson Walker LLP, the firm at the center of a legal ethics scandal over the undisclosed relationship between a lawyer and a bankruptcy judge, has stepped down as Chapter 11 counsel to hand sanitizer maker 4E Brands Northamerica LLC as a Texas bankruptcy judge considers revoking $800,000 in legal fees paid to the firm in the case.

  • Ex-NJ Judge Says Femininity Bias Keeps Workplace Suit Alive

    A former New Jersey state judge called on a federal court Tuesday to reject court officials' bid to dismiss the remaining claims in her workplace discrimination lawsuit, arguing that her superiors' attitude about her pricey handbags and jewelry amounts to gender bias.

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    Meet The Attys Facing Off At High Court In Trump DQ Case

    The attorneys facing off at the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday over whether former President Donald Trump can appear on Colorado's primary election ballot are both described by their colleagues as incredibly talented and smart lawyers.

  • Mass. Atty Gets 2 Years For 'Corruptly' Pushing Pot Bribe Plot

    A former Massachusetts attorney "violated his oath corruptly" by bribing a police chief with payments to his brother to win a local marijuana license for a client, a federal judge said Wednesday as he handed down a two-year prison term.

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    Fla. Courts' Fines And Fees Trap Poor In Debt, ABA Finds

    The public defense group of the American Bar Association on Wednesday released a comprehensive report lambasting the fines and fees system in Florida's county-level misdemeanor court system, recommending the courts eliminate so-called user fees and establish an "ability-to-pay standard."

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    Trump Renews Push For DA Disqualification In Ga. Case

    Former President Donald Trump on Wednesday opposed Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis' argument that she should not be disqualified from prosecuting the Georgia election interference case after it was confirmed that she is involved in a romantic relationship with one of the special prosecutors she hired.

  • GOP Sens. Blast Ill. Judges' Moves For Diversity In Oral Args

    Two Republican senators are questioning what they say are "unethical and unconstitutional" standing orders issued by at least three judges in the Southern District of Illinois that aim to promote participation by newer, female and minority attorneys.

  • Alec Baldwin Trial Date Scrapped After Judge Shuffle

    Alec Baldwin's trial date in August has been nixed following a judge reassignment in the case against the actor, who is accused of involuntary manslaughter in connection with the on-set shooting death of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins during the filming of "Rust" in New Mexico.

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    Georgia's Top Judge Asks Legislators To Keep Judges Safe

    Attacks on and threats to judges across the nation are a serious threat that must be addressed in order to ensure "the very independence of our judiciary," Georgia's chief justice told legislators during his second State of the Judiciary address in Atlanta on Wednesday.

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Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Can Recalcitrant Attys Use Social Media? Author Photo

    Social media can be intimidating for reluctant lawyers but it can also be richly rewarding, as long as attorneys remember that professional accounts will always reflect on their firms and colleagues, and follow some best practices to avoid embarrassment, says Sean Marotta at Hogan Lovells.

  • Keys To Digitizing Inefficient Contract Management Processes Author Photo

    Neville Eisenberg and Mark Grayson at BCLP explain how they sped up contract execution for one client by replacing email with a centralized, digital tool for negotiations and review, and how the principles they adhered to can be helpful for other law firms looking to improve poorly managed contract management processes.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Can Firms Coach Associates Remotely? Author Photo

    Practicing law through virtual platforms will likely persist even after the pandemic, so law firms and senior lawyers should consider refurbishing their associate mentoring programs to facilitate personal connections, professionalism and effective training in a remote environment, says Carol Goodman at Herrick Feinstein.

  • How Law Firms Can Welcome And Celebrate Autistic Lawyers Author Photo

    As the U.S. observes Autism Acceptance Month, autistic attorney Haley Moss describes the societal barriers and stereotypes that keep neurodivergent lawyers from disclosing their disabilities, and how law firms can better accommodate and level the playing field for attorneys whose minds work outside of the prescribed norm.

  • Law Firm Tips For Evaluating AI And Machine Learning Tools Author Photo

    Many legal technology vendors now sell artificial intelligence and machine learning tools at a premium price tag, but law firms must take the time to properly evaluate them as not all offerings generate process efficiencies or even use the technologies advertised, says Steven Magnuson at Ballard Spahr.

  • A Call For Personal Accountability On Diversity And Inclusion Author Photo

    While chief legal officers are increasingly involved in creating corporate diversity, inclusion and anti-bigotry policies, all lawyers have a responsibility to be discrimination busters and bias interrupters regardless of the title they hold, says Veta T. Richardson at the Association of Corporate Counsel.

  • Learning How To Code Can Unleash New Potential In Lawyers Author Photo

    Every lawyer can begin incorporating aspects of software development in their day-to-day practice with little to no changes in their existing tools or workflow, and legal organizations that take steps to encourage this exploration of programming can transform into tech incubators, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Supporting Associates Amid Pandemic's Mental Health Toll Author Photo

    As junior associates increasingly report burnout, work-life conflict and loneliness during the pandemic, law firms should take tangible actions to reduce the stigma around seeking help, and to model desired well-being behaviors from the top down, say Stacey Whiteley at the New York State Bar Association and Robin Belleau at Kirkland.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: Should My Law Firm Take On An Apprentice? Author Photo

    Mentoring a law student who is preparing for the bar exam without attending law school is an arduous process that is not for everyone, but there are also several benefits for law firms hosting apprenticeship programs, says Jessica Jackson, the lawyer guiding Kim Kardashian West's legal education.

  • The Importance Of Client Engagement In Law Firm Innovation Author Photo

    As clients increasingly want law firms to serve as innovation platforms, firms must understand that there is no one-size-fits-all approach — the key is a nimble innovation function focused on listening and knowledge sharing, says Mark Brennan at Hogan Lovells.

  • The Unique Challenges Facing Women-Owned Law Firms Author Photo

    In addition to establishing their brand from scratch, women who start their own law firms must overcome inherent bias against female lawyers and convince prospective clients to put aside big-firm preferences, says Joel Stern at the National Association of Minority and Women Owned Law Firms.

  • The Pursuit Of Wellness In BigLaw: Lessons From My Journey Author Photo

    Jane Jeong at Cooley shares how grueling BigLaw schedules and her own perfectionism emotionally bankrupted her, and why attorneys struggling with burnout should consider making small changes to everyday habits.

  • Why We Must Recruit And Advance More Black Prosecutors Author Photo

    Black Americans make up a disproportionate percentage of the incarcerated population but are underrepresented among elected prosecutors, so the legal community — from law schools to prosecutor offices — must commit to addressing these disappointing demographics, says Erika Gilliam-Booker at the National Black Prosecutors Association.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Can Associates Deal With Overload? Author Photo

    Young lawyers overwhelmed with a crushing workload must tackle the problem on two fronts — learning how to say no, and understanding how to break down projects into manageable parts, says Jay Harrington at Harrington Communications.

  • A Scientific Path For Improving Diversity At Law Firms Author Photo

    Law firms could combine industrial organizational psychology and machine learning to study prospective hires' analytical thinking, stress response and similar attributes — which could lead to recruiting from a more diverse candidate pool, say Ali Shahidi and Bess Sully at Sheppard Mullin.

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