Massachusetts

  • February 26, 2024

    Mass. Casino Gets 2nd Fine For Taking Illegal College Bets

    The Massachusetts Gaming Commission on Monday fined Encore Boston Harbor $40,000 for improperly taking bets on games involving in-state colleges, the second such punishment doled out to the casino in the past seven months.

  • February 26, 2024

    Murder, Robbery Exoneree Seeks $1M For Lost Years

    A Massachusetts man who spent more than half his life in prison before being exonerated for a 1994 murder and robbery has filed a lawsuit seeking $1 million in compensation under a 20-year-old state law.

  • February 26, 2024

    Ropes & Gray-Led THL Taking Agiliti Private In $2.5B Deal

    Medical equipment management company Agiliti is going private in a deal with private equity firm Thomas H. Lee Partners, Agiliti announced Monday.

  • February 26, 2024

    Jury Awards Woodworking Co. $158K Over 'Lemon' Machine

    A Georgia federal jury has found that the manufacturer of a high-tech woodworking machine breached warranty duties to the device's buyer, awarding nearly $160,000 to a Massachusetts business that alleged it was sold a "lemon" of a machine.

  • February 26, 2024

    1st Circ. Rejects Crypto Founder's Hollow Fraud Appeal

    A cryptocurrency founder convicted of fraud hitched his appeal to "inapplicable precedent" and failed to muster an argument why a judge's blocking of testimony from government witnesses deprived his defense of material and favorable evidence, the First Circuit said in upholding the guilty verdict.

  • February 24, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Social Media Laws & Bump Stocks

    The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments related to three big-ticket cases this week in a pair of First Amendment challenges to Florida and Texas laws prohibiting social media platforms from removing content or users based on their viewpoints and a dispute over the federal government's authority to ban bump stocks.

  • February 23, 2024

    No Lie In Calling A Lemon A Lemon, Jury Told At Trial's End

    At the close of a trial nearly eight years in the making, counsel for a Massachusetts woodworking shop facing claims that it bad-mouthed its machinery suppliers to others in the industry denied claims Friday that the shop's owner-operator leveled death threats during a heated dispute over a malfunctioning piece of equipment.

  • February 23, 2024

    Gov.'s Romantic Ties To Top Court Pick May Spark Recusals

    Massachusetts Gov. Maura Healey's selection of a former romantic partner to serve on the state's Supreme Judicial Court could be grounds for the justice to recuse herself from certain cases, though those scenarios would be relatively rare, legal ethics experts told Law360.

  • February 23, 2024

    Mass. Ruling Seen As 'Sea Change' In Young Adult Sentencing

    A first-of-its-kind ruling by Massachusetts’ top appeals court recently declared sentences of life without parole for anyone under 21 to be unconstitutional, and advocates say the decision and the science backing it up could provide a road map for young adult sentencing reform nationwide.

  • February 23, 2024

    Tobacco Cos. Look To Nix COPD Suit Decades After Diagnosis

    Tobacco companies R.J. Reynolds and Philip Morris asked a Massachusetts state judge on Friday to end a wrongful death lawsuit brought decades after a woman's COPD diagnosis and nearly three years after her death, pointing to a state high court ruling last summer that affirmed strict time limits for such claims.

  • February 23, 2024

    WilmerHale Scores Win For Hearing Impaired Mass. Prisoners

    After an eight-year legal fight, WilmerHale and several nonprofit legal advocacy organizations recently won a major ruling from a federal judge to help change how deaf and hard-of-hearing Massachusetts prisoners receive emergency notifications and other announcements.

  • February 23, 2024

    J&J Unit Assails Knee Replacement IP Verdict At Fed. Circ.

    Johnson & Johnson subsidiary DePuy Synthes wants the Federal Circuit to undo a $20 million jury verdict against it for infringing an orthopedic surgeon's knee replacement patent.

  • February 23, 2024

    Balloon Co. Blew Up Appeal Of Fraud Verdict, 1st Circ. Says

    A bid from the owner of a defunct balloon company to set aside an already-reduced jury award won't fly, the First Circuit has concluded, finding that the company's own acknowledgment about transferred funds "dooms their appeal."

  • February 23, 2024

    1st Circ. Told Wind Farm's Approval Should've Been A Breeze

    A wind farm developer has asked the First Circuit to reject fishing groups' challenge to the U.S. Department of the Interior's approval of a proposed project off the coast of Martha's Vineyard, saying the effort to sink the plan can't survive because the agency did things by the book.

  • February 23, 2024

    New 'Varsity Blues' Judge Should Hear Plea Redo, Parent Says

    A former television executive looking to have her guilty plea wiped out in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions case asked Friday for a different judge, arguing that U.S. District Judge Nathaniel M. Gorton's "incorrect" ruling is the basis for her motion to vacate her conviction.

  • February 23, 2024

    US Gun Cos. Seek Time For Justices' Input On Mexico's Suit

    Gunmakers facing a recently revived lawsuit looking to hold them liable for firearms trafficking and cartel violence in Mexico on Friday asked a Boston federal judge to stand down and halt proceedings so the U.S. Supreme Court can have a chance to review the case.

  • February 23, 2024

    Mass. Tax Panel Grants Part Of Homeowner's Value Appeal

    The Massachusetts Appellate Tax Board said that the valuation of a single-family home should be slightly increased from the previous tax year because of rising home values in the neighborhood, but it determined that the local assessor's valuation was too high.

  • February 23, 2024

    Motorola, Mass. Police Sued For Using Intercepting Devices

    Motorola sold technology that let the Massachusetts State Police make illegal, warrantless recordings during investigations, according to a federal class action filed by four men claiming to be subjects of the secret recordings.

  • February 23, 2024

    Red Sox Network Exec Says 18 Mos. Enough For Billing Fraud

    A former vice president with the network that broadcasts Boston Red Sox and Boston Bruins games argued Thursday that he should spend no more than 18 months in federal prison after a jury convicted him of bilking his former employer through a phony invoice scheme.

  • February 22, 2024

    Mastercard Faces Monopolization Claims Over Digital Tokens

    Mastercard has been stonewalling digital wallet startup OV Loop, refusing to provide needed tokens and thereby excluding OV Loop from the mobile payment services market, all part of Mastercard's effort to maintain its chokehold on payment processing and continue to charge supracompetitive fees on transactions, according to a suit filed Wednesday.

  • February 22, 2024

    CVS Says Redbox Won't Remove Kiosks Despite Expired Deal

    Pharmacy chain CVS filed a lawsuit against Redbox in Illinois state court Wednesday alleging the DVD rental company has refused to remove its kiosks from 10 CVS stores across the country after their deal expired, and is seeking over $424,000 in unpaid commissions and the removal of the kiosks.

  • February 22, 2024

    YouTube Privacy Judge 'Flummoxed' By Kids' Liability Theory

    A California federal judge indicated Thursday that she's open to trimming a revived proposed class action alleging Google and companies that host child-friendly YouTube channels illegally collected children's data from targeted ads, expressing concerns about the requested relief and saying she's "flummoxed" by the consumers' belated liability theory against the channels' owners.

  • February 22, 2024

    Mass. Medical Regulator Seeks Pregnancy Center Records

    A group of pregnancy crisis centers in Massachusetts and their medical director have been hit with a civil investigative demand by the state's medical board, which says it is looking into allegations the clinics "may be engaging in deceptive practices" and allowing unlicensed employees to perform ultrasounds and other procedures.

  • February 22, 2024

    Feds Can't Offset Nuclear Cleanup Bill With Trusts' Earnings

    The U.S. Department of Energy wasn't able to convince the U.S. Court of Federal Claims that nuclear utilities' high earnings on nuclear decommissioning funds should erase their $149 million damages claim against the department for delayed nuclear waste cleanup, according to an opinion made public this week.

  • February 22, 2024

    Biotech VC Firm ORI Capital Closes $260M Fund

    Biotech venture capital firm ORI Capital announced Thursday that it has closed a $260 million fund to invest in early-stage biotech companies globally.

Expert Analysis

  • In-Office Engagement Is Essential To Associate Development

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    As law firms develop return-to-office policies that allow hybrid work arrangements, they should incorporate the specific types of in-person engagement likely to help associates develop attributes common among successful firm leaders, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Perspectives

    A Judge's Pitch To Revive The Jury Trial

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    Ohio state Judge Pierre Bergeron explains how the decline of the jury trial threatens public confidence in the judiciary and even democracy as a whole, and he offers ideas to restore this sacred right.

  • How To Recognize And Recover From Lawyer Loneliness

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    Law can be one of the loneliest professions, but there are practical steps that attorneys and their managers can take to help themselves and their peers improve their emotional health, strengthen their social bonds and protect their performance, says psychologist and attorney Traci Cipriano.

  • Opinion

    Litigation Funding Disclosure Should Be Mandatory

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    Despite the Appellate Rules Committee's recent deferral of the issue of requiring third-party litigation funding disclosure, such a mandate is necessary to ensure the even-handed administration of justice across all cases, says David Levitt at Hinshaw.

  • Recalling USWNT's Legal PR Playbook Amid World Cup Bid

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    As the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team strives to take home another World Cup trophy, their 2022 pay equity settlement with the U.S. Soccer Federation serves as a good reminder that winning in the court of public opinion can be more powerful than a victory inside the courtroom, says Hector Valle at Vianovo.

  • Mass. Age Bias Ruling Holds Employer Liability Lessons

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    The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court’s recent ruling in Adams v. Schneider Electric — upholding a laid-off employee’s age discrimination claim — is an important reminder that employers may face liability even if a decision maker unknowingly applies a discriminatory corporate strategy, say attorneys at Armstrong Teasdale.

  • It's Not You, It's Me: Breaking Up With Mass. FCA Prosecutors

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    A recent Massachusetts U.S. Attorney's Office settlement, which required a hospital to admit to certain facts, continues a state trend away from traditionally defense-friendly nonadmission language and may complicate the prospects of amicably resolving future False Claims Act cases, say Jonathan York and Scott Memmott at Morgan Lewis.

  • Immigration Program Pitfalls Exacerbate Physician Shortages

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    Eliminating shortcomings from U.S. immigration regulations and policies could help mitigate the national shortage of physicians by encouraging foreign physicians to work in medically underserved areas, but progress has been halted by partisan gridlock, say Alison Hitz and Dana Schwarz at Clark Hill.

  • Perspectives

    Mallory Gives Plaintiffs A Better Shot At Justice

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    Critics of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Mallory v. Norfolk Southern claim it opens the door to litigation tourism, but the ruling simply gives plaintiffs more options — enabling them to seek justice against major corporations in the best possible court, say Rayna Kessler and Ethan Seidenberg at Robins Kaplan.

  • What's Next For Enviro Justice After Affirmative Action Ban?

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision striking down affirmative action measures in university admissions raises questions about the future of the Biden administration's environmental justice initiatives — but EJ advocates may still have reasons for cautious optimism, say J. Michael Showalter and Robert Middleton at ArentFox Schiff.

  • Strategies For Conducting More Effective Plea Negotiations

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    The sentencing of “Varsity Blues” scandal architect Rick Singer earlier this year provides a helpful case study on the plea bargain process, spotlighting three key negotiation concepts and seven tactics for defense attorneys, say lawyers at Riley Safer.

  • Courts Can Overturn Deficient State Regulations, Too

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    While suits challenging federal regulations have become commonplace, such cases against state agencies are virtually nonexistent, but many states have provisions that allow litigants to bring suit for regulations with inadequate cost-benefit analyses, says Reeve Bull at the Virginia Office of Regulatory Management.

  • How Construction Industry Can Help Mitigate Wildfire Impact

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    The recent uptick of wildfires across North America has resulted in renewed calls for construction job site changes and increased management of sites in order to mitigate the risk of outbreaks and workers' exposure to hazardous air quality, say Josephine Bahn and Jeffery Mullen at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Tales From The Trenches Of Remote Depositions

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    As practitioners continue to conduct depositions remotely in the post-pandemic world, these virtual environments are rife with opportunities for improper behavior such as witness coaching, scripted testimony and a general lack of civility — but there are methods to prevent and combat these behaviors, say Jennifer Gibbs and Bennett Moss at Zelle.

  • Minn. Noncompete Ban May Add To Nat'l Venue Choice Tangle

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    With federal courts already split on which laws govern choice-of-venue clauses in noncompete agreements, the new Minnesota statute that bans noncompetes and empowers workers to void any employment contract that requires out-of-state adjudication will complicate compliance for multistate employers, says Sarah Tishler at Beck Reed.

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