Massachusetts

  • March 14, 2024

    Mass. High Court Says Tufts Win In Tenure Case 'Premature'

    Tenured professors at Tufts University whose salaries were slashed under a newly enacted requirement that they bring in at least half their income through research grants will have another chance to prove those pay cuts undermine academic freedom, Massachusetts' highest court said Thursday.

  • March 14, 2024

    NLRB Certifies Dartmouth Men's Basketball Player Union

    Dartmouth College must bargain with its men's basketball team after the National Labor Relations Board certified the players' recent landmark vote to unionize with the Service Employees International Union on Thursday, but a legal challenge looms.

  • March 14, 2024

    Most States Fall Short In Disclosing Justices' Finance Reports

    The vast majority of state supreme courts make it exceedingly difficult for the public to get information about justices' financial entanglements, and the information they do give out is often scant at best, according to a report released Thursday.

  • March 14, 2024

    Ex-Mass. Pol Says Federalism Bars COVID Fraud Cases

    A former Massachusetts state senator charged with collecting CARES Act-funded unemployment benefits while being paid for consulting work said in a motion filed Thursday that the 10th Amendment prohibits the federal government from prosecuting him for actions that occurred at the state level.

  • March 14, 2024

    Feds Seek 20 Mos. For Aegerion Fraud 'Puppet Master'

    A pharmaceutical sales representative who gloated about being a "puppet master" for false insurance claims for Aegerion's cholesterol drug should serve 20 months in prison, the U.S. government has told a Boston federal judge.

  • March 13, 2024

    Mass. Gov. Announces Pardon Plan For Marijuana Possession

    Massachusetts Gov. Maura T. Healey has announced plans for sweeping pardons of misdemeanor cannabis possession convictions, following the directive of President Joe Biden, who urged state executives to follow his lead in pardoning low-level marijuana offenses.

  • March 13, 2024

    Ex-NFLer Faced Racism As School Superintendent, Suit Says

    A former NFL player was subjected to racism as the first Black superintendent of schools in Wayland, Massachusetts, and was forced out of his job when he took steps to address it, according to a suit filed Wednesday in state court.

  • March 13, 2024

    IRobot, SharkNinja Settle Last Of Roomba Patent Fight

    IRobot and SharkNinja have reached a settlement in principle to resolve what remains of a long-standing patent dispute related to the Roomba robotic vacuum cleaner.

  • March 13, 2024

    Mass. Justice Presses AG On Fast-Track Bid For Zoning Case

    A Massachusetts high court justice on Wednesday expressed concerns about the state attorney general's aggressive bid to fast-track the enforcement of a divisive housing law to the full court as soon as May.  

  • March 13, 2024

    Patriots Owner Flags $2M Lien On 'Useless' Skydiving Facility

    The real estate business of New England Patriots owner Bob Kraft asked a Massachusetts judge to discharge a $2 million mechanic's lien on a defunct indoor wind tunnel and skydiving attraction at a shopping center next to the football team's stadium.

  • March 12, 2024

    Walgreens, Kenvue Unit Sued Over Benzene In Acne Products

    Walgreens, Kenvue unit Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. and Genomma Lab face a trio of proposed consumer fraud class actions in California federal court by customers who alleged their acne treatment products contain unsafe levels of benzene, but that each of the companies failed to disclose its presence in their labeling.

  • March 12, 2024

    Roberto Clemente's Family Appeals Puerto Rico TM Loss

    The family of the late MLB Hall of Famer Roberto Clemente is asking the First Circuit to revive trademark claims against Puerto Rico for the unauthorized use of the former Pittsburgh Pirates outfielder's image on license plates and vehicle registrations.

  • March 12, 2024

    Harvard Data Fraud Report To Be Released In Libel Case

    A Harvard Business School's internal investigative report concerning data fraud allegations against a suspended professor will be made public in a defamation lawsuit against the school, a federal district judge ordered Tuesday.

  • March 12, 2024

    GE Aerospace Plans $650M Manufacturing Investment

    GE Aerospace said Tuesday it plans to invest $650 million into its manufacturing facilities and supply chain this year to bolster support for its commercial and defense customers.

  • March 12, 2024

    AT&T Offloaded Pensions In Risky Annuity Deal, Suit Says

    AT&T shirked its fiduciary duty and put 96,000 workers' retirement savings in jeopardy by transferring pension obligations to a "risky" annuity provider, according to a proposed class action filed in Massachusetts federal court.

  • March 11, 2024

    Fed. Circ. OKs Boston Drug Developer's Patent Win

    A Boston-area biotech developer that has yet to bring a product to market persuaded the Federal Circuit on Monday to affirm a finding by an administrative patent board last year that stripped a smaller Chinese rival of a patent covering a way of using a type of sulfonic acid to potentially treat Alzheimer's disease.

  • March 11, 2024

    Mexico Says High Court Long Shot Not Worth Halting Gun Suit

    The Mexican government asked a Boston federal judge to keep its lawsuit against gun manufacturers moving along while the companies float what they referred to as "sky is falling" arguments to the U.S. Supreme Court challenging a First Circuit ruling that they are not immune from claims they aid and abet drug cartel violence.

  • March 11, 2024

    Entire Deadspin Staff Cut After Site's Sale To European Firm

    All existing employees of sports blogging site Deadspin have been laid off after finding out Monday that the blog's owner, private equity-backed G/O Media Inc., has agreed to sell the site to European firm Lineup Publishing for an undisclosed price.

  • March 11, 2024

    FTC, 10 States Sue 'Sham' Women's Cancer Fund

    The Federal Trade Commission and 10 state attorneys general have filed a federal complaint against a Pennsylvania-based cancer charity fund, calling the foundation a "sham" that deceived donors out of $18 million over five years.

  • March 11, 2024

    Most Claims Trimmed In Ford Faulty Transmission Suit

    A Massachusetts federal judge has thrown out the bulk of a suit alleging Ford Motor Co. knowingly sold vehicles with a faulty transmission system, while allowing breach of implied warranty, fraudulent concealment and state law claims to proceed.

  • March 11, 2024

    SEC Can't Rely On 'Flawed' Ruling To Avoid Retrial, Atty Says

    A Connecticut lawyer facing retrial in a securities fraud case told the First Circuit that the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission can't lean on a summary judgment finding that was also flawed.

  • March 08, 2024

    Dartmouth Hoops Union Could Touch Off Legal Madness

    A recent vote by the Dartmouth College men's basketball team to form a union could set the stage for the next round of litigation in shaping the rights of collegiate athletes, but experts told Law360 some steep obstacles could stand in the way of a breakthrough ruling that turns student athletes into full-fledged employees.

  • March 08, 2024

    Mass. Bar Agency Seeks Name Revision Due To Slavery Link

    The state agency that regulates attorney conduct in Massachusetts is proposing a name change that would replace an archaic word seen by some as tainted by an association with slavery.

  • March 08, 2024

    Mass. Justices OK Town's 'Clever' Gradual Tobacco Ban

    A Massachusetts town's admittedly novel bylaw phasing out the sale of tobacco by prohibiting sales to anyone born in this century could become a model for other local communities after the regulation withstood a legal challenge by a group of retailers at the state's highest court Friday.

  • March 08, 2024

    Debt-Stricken Homeowners Fight Back After High Court Ruling

    Ten months after a landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision finding a Minnesota county wrongly held onto excess proceeds it reaped after seizing a woman’s condominium and selling it to settle a tax debt, states are scrambling to reexamine their laws as financially distressed homeowners file new suits challenging the practice.

Expert Analysis

  • And Now A Word From The Panel: Tracking MDL Geography

    Author Photo

    In recent years, the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation has predominantly selected states east of the Mississippi River as venues for new MDLs — but with half of the proceedings it has created in recent months venued in Arizona and California, the panel is not neglecting the western part of the country, says Alan Rothman at Sidley.

  • Understanding Discovery Obligations In Era Of Generative AI

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    Attorneys and businesses must adapt to the unique discovery challenges presented by generative artificial intelligence, such as chatbot content and prompts, while upholding the principles of fairness, transparency and compliance with legal obligations in federal civil litigation, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • An Overview Of Circuit Courts' Interlocutory Motion Standards

    Author Photo

    The Federal Arbitration Act allows litigants to file an immediate appeal from an order declining to enforce an arbitration agreement, but the circuit courts differ on the specific requirements for the underlying order as well as which motion must be filed, as demonstrated in several 2023 decisions, says Kristen Mueller at Mueller Law.

  • The Case For Post-Bar Clerk Training Programs At Law Firms

    Author Photo

    In today's competitive legal hiring market, an intentionally designed training program for law school graduates awaiting bar admission can be an effective way of creating a pipeline of qualified candidates, says Brent Daub at Gilson Daub.

  • Attorneys Have An Ethical Duty To Protect The Judiciary

    Author Photo

    The tenor of public disagreement and debate has become increasingly hostile against judges, and though the legislative branch is trying to ameliorate this safety gap, lawyers have a moral imperative and professional requirement to stand with judges in defusing attacks against them and their rulings, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • What Cos. Should Know About FTC's Proposed Junk Fee Rule

    Author Photo

    The Federal Trade Commission recently announced a notice of proposed rulemaking targeting junk fees and how businesses may advertise prices to consumers — and since it would give the agency powers to seek monetary penalties against businesses that do not comply, companies should look to get ahead now, say Phyllis Marcus and Nicole Johnson at Hunton Andrews.

  • FTC Orange Book Move Signals New Pharma Patent Scrutiny

    Author Photo

    The Federal Trade Commission's recent dispute against improper listing of drug patents in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Orange Book indicates heightened surveillance of the pharmaceutical industry, particularly where competition-related consequences of patent or regulatory processes are concerned, say attorneys at Fenwick.

  • AI Can Help Lawyers Overcome The Programming Barrier

    Author Photo

    Legal professionals without programming expertise can use generative artificial intelligence to harness the power of automation and other technology solutions to streamline their work, without the steep learning curve traditionally associated with coding, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Harvard's Broker Fight Shows Active Risk Management Is Key

    Author Photo

    Harvard University’s recently filed suit against its insurance broker for alleged malpractice in handling the Students for Fair Admissions claim illustrates that risk management requires the concerted effort of policyholders, brokers and insurers to protect against disastrous losses, say William McMichael and David Klein at Pillsbury.

  • Preparing Law Students For A New, AI-Assisted Legal World

    Author Photo

    As artificial intelligence rapidly transforms the legal landscape, law schools must integrate technology and curricula that address AI’s innate challenges — from ethics to data security — to help students stay ahead of the curve, say Daniel Garrie at Law & Forensics, Ryan Abbott at JAMS and Karen Silverman at Cantellus Group.

  • General Counsel Need Data Literacy To Keep Up With AI

    Author Photo

    With the rise of accessible and powerful generative artificial intelligence solutions, it is imperative for general counsel to understand the use and application of data for myriad important activities, from evaluating the e-discovery process to monitoring compliance analytics and more, says Colin Levy at Malbek.

  • AI Isn't The Wild West, So Prepare Now For Bias Risks

    Author Photo

    In addition to President Joe Biden's recent historic executive order on safe, secure and trustworthy artificial intelligence, there are existing federal and state laws prohibiting fraud, defamation and even discrimination, so companies considering using or developing AI should take steps to minimize legal and business risks, says civil rights attorney Farhana Khera.

  • Navigating Discovery Of Generative AI Information

    Author Photo

    As generative artificial intelligence tools become increasingly ubiquitous, companies must make sure to preserve generative AI data when there is reasonable expectation of litigation, and to include transcripts in litigation hold notices, as they may be relevant to discovery requests, say Nick Peterson and Corey Hauser at Wiley.

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

    Author Photo

    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Cos. Must Address Growing Chatbot Class Action Risk

    Author Photo

    Following a new wave of chatbot-related consumer data privacy litigation and expanding compliance obligations created by state legislatures, businesses using such technology face a high-risk environment for wiretapping allegations, with inconsistent court rulings to date and uncertain legal holdings ahead, say attorneys at Pierce Atwood.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Massachusetts archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!