Legal Ethics

  • April 24, 2024

    BREAKING: Biden's Latest Judge Picks Include Blocked US Atty Nom

    President Joe Biden announced seven judicial nominee picks on Wednesday including one for the Northern District of Illinois, which covers Chicago, whom he previously nominated to be U.S. attorney for the district, but has been held up by a Republican senator.

  • April 24, 2024

    California Atty Must Face Defamation Claims Over Texts

    An Orange County attorney cannot hide behind claims of litigation privilege and must face defamation claims over disparaging text messages he sent about a contractor working on his home, a California state appeals court said Tuesday.

  • April 23, 2024

    Sanctioned Patent Challenger Fights VLSI Bid To ID Members

    Patent Quality Assurance LLC, which successfully challenged a VLSI chip patent but was sanctioned by the patent office, urged a Virginia federal judge Tuesday not to make it identify the people behind the company, saying VLSI wants their names to "seek retribution against them."

  • April 23, 2024

    ​​​​​​​Feds Ask 30 Years For Ex-FDIC Atty In Child Exploitation Case

    A former attorney with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. who admitted to participating in online groups aimed at sexually exploiting children should be sentenced to 30 years behind bars, prosecutors told a Virginia federal judge Tuesday, saying he "treated the online enticement of children like a sport."

  • April 23, 2024

    Mich. Judge Threatens Contempt After Atty's 'Star Snitch' Post

    A lawyer defending a Republican elector against criminal charges called a government witness a "star snitch" in a February Facebook post, prompting a Michigan state judge Tuesday to warn the entire courtroom that similar behavior going forward could lead to witness tampering charges.

  • April 23, 2024

    Judge Overturns Biz's H-2B Ban, Blaming 'Gaslighting' Atty

    A U.S. Department of Labor administrative law judge overturned a decision to debar a Minnesota concessions stand company from the H-2B visa program over its failure to pay back wages and penalties, saying the small business's owner had only followed his attorney's advice — right into a legal disaster.

  • April 23, 2024

    Tabloid Made Deal To Save Trump 'Embarrassment,' Jury Told

    A longtime tabloid executive told a Manhattan jury Tuesday that he struck a secret deal with Donald Trump ahead of the 2016 presidential election to plant negative stories about his opponents and suppress salacious stories that could cause his campaign "embarrassment."

  • April 23, 2024

    La. Atty Asks Justices To Stay Frivolous Filing Fine

    A Louisiana attorney is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to bail her out of a $29,000 penalty from a district judge for frivolous filings and claiming that she was poisoned in retaliation for claims against Louisiana State University's medical residency program.

  • April 23, 2024

    Ex-Public Defender Wants 4th Circ. To End Wait In Bias Suit

    A former public defender suing the federal judiciary for allegedly failing to take her sexual harassment claims seriously asked the Fourth Circuit on Tuesday to force a federal judge's hand after more than four months without a ruling following a bench trial, saying a decision on her long-pending bid for a preliminary injunction is overdue.

  • April 23, 2024

    Ga. Bar Race Bias Suit Should Stay Dead, 11th Circ. Told

    The State Bar of Georgia told the Eleventh Circuit on Tuesday that a federal court was right to wash its hands of a racial bias suit filed by an attorney against the bar last year, because the Peach State's high court is the only court with jurisdiction over attorney discipline issues.

  • April 23, 2024

    Locke Lord Wins Appellate Review Of Malpractice Suit

    Locke Lord LLP has convinced a New Jersey state appellate court to review a trial court's ruling rejecting the firm's attempt to evade a malpractice suit alleging that it mishandled a transaction involving an oil refinery project in North Dakota.

  • April 23, 2024

    Denver Wants Law Firm To Turn Over Docs For Fraud Probe

    Fraud investigators for Denver Human Services have asked a state judge to force personal injury firm Ramos Law to provide employment records for one of the firm's case managers, saying the law firm has not yet provided records in response to subpoenas.

  • April 23, 2024

    Blank Rome Attys Defend Lawsuit Called A 'Pound Of Flesh'

    Partners with BigLaw firm Blank Rome LLP said they had legitimate reasons to file a lawsuit against a former attorney from the firm, rejecting accusations that their lawsuit was an effort to punish their ex-colleague for switching to the plaintiffs' bar.

  • April 23, 2024

    6th Circ. Backs Dykema's Win In Ex-Secretary's Age Bias Suit

    The Sixth Circuit won't reinstate a former Dykema legal secretary's age discrimination case, saying Tuesday she failed to show that her supervisor — whom she accused of giving her adult diapers for her 50th birthday and frequently asking her if she planned to retire — had anything to do with her firing.

  • April 23, 2024

    Boies Schiller Attys For Epstein Victims Beat Sanctions Bid

    A New York federal judge on Tuesday evening rejected a request by associates of Jeffrey Epstein to sanction Boies Schiller Flexner LLP's chair and a co-managing partner, while also denying the Boies Schiller attorneys' subsequent motion to sanction the Epstein associates' counsel.

  • April 23, 2024

    'Nate The Lawyer' Loses NJ Defamation Suit For Good

    YouTube legal livestreamer "Nate the Lawyer" saw his defamation suit against the operator of a social media watchdog account tossed for a final time, after a New Jersey federal judge ruled that he had not shown that any false statements about him were made with reckless disregard for the truth.

  • April 23, 2024

    Reciprocal Discipline Not Time Limited, Colo. Justices Say

    A former Colorado attorney cannot escape disbarment there, the state Supreme Court has ruled, finding a rule placing a time limit on sanctions does not apply to reciprocal discipline, and therefore the attorney's 2022 disbarment in Washington, D.C., for misconduct that occurred in 2008 and 2009 may be reciprocated in Colorado.

  • April 23, 2024

    Lin Wood Seeks Defamation Suit Pause Amid Insurance Spat

    Counsel for disbarred attorney Lin Wood has asked a Georgia federal judge to halt a defamation suit brought by Wood's former colleagues while a spat over his legal insurance plays out in the Georgia court system.

  • April 23, 2024

    Coverage Recap: Day 2 Of Trump's NY Hush Money Trial

    Law360 reporters are providing live updates from the Manhattan criminal courthouse as Donald Trump goes on trial for allegedly falsifying business records related to hush money payments ahead of the 2016 election. Here's a full recap from day two.

  • April 23, 2024

    Trump 'Detached From Facts' In Fla. Docs Case, Feds Say

    Prosecutors in Donald Trump's classified documents case have told a Florida federal judge that the former president's legal team was trying to paint a false narrative of political bias in its motion to obtain more discovery.

  • April 23, 2024

    PE Giant Faces Sanctions Bid For Mexico Corruption Claim

    Advent International Corp. and its counsel at Ropes & Gray and Quinn Emanuel allegedly fabricated claims that a Mexican corporation's lawyers corruptly influenced prosecutors and judges in the country to freeze the private equity firm's assets and issue arrest warrants for executives, according to a filing in Massachusetts federal court.

  • April 23, 2024

    Why A New York Federal Judge 'Loves' Discovery Disputes

    While discovery disputes can be a frustration for many judges and attorneys, U.S. District Judge Denise L. Cote says that she loves them because they teach her a lot about the cases she is overseeing, the parties involved and the attorneys working on them.

  • April 23, 2024

    Trump Atty 'Losing Credibility' In Defending Posts, Judge Says

    The New York judge presiding over former President Donald Trump's hush money case on Tuesday gave a harsh appraisal of defense attorney Todd Blanche's attempts to keep his client out of criminal contempt for disparaging witnesses online, saying the lawyer was "losing all credibility" as he argued Trump was "being very careful" with his words.

  • April 22, 2024

    NJ Town Can't Beat Sanctions Over Legal Malpractice Suit

    A New Jersey state appeals panel upheld Monday, in a published opinion, sanctions against the borough of Englewood Cliffs for bringing a now-dismissed legal malpractice suit after a purportedly unfavorable affordable housing settlement.

  • April 22, 2024

    Atty Says Class Bid Over Bankrupt Firm's Hurricane Ads Fails

    A proposed class action against troubled Houston law firm MMA Law Firm, a former partner and others accused of participating in an illegal scheme to scare up profitable litigation following a hurricane doesn't offer enough evidence for certification and didn't meet a filing deadline, the ex-partner told a Texas federal judge.

Expert Analysis

  • What Law Firms Should Know Amid Rise In DQ Motions

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    As disqualification motions proliferate, law firms need to be aware of the types of conflicts that most often lead to disqualification, the types of attorneys who may be affected and how to reduce their exposure to these motions, says Matthew Henderson at Hinshaw.

  • Data Protection Steps To Consider After Biden Privacy Order

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    A recent White House executive order casts a spotlight on the criticality of securing sensitive content communications, presenting challenges and necessitating a recalibration of practices, especially for lawyers, says Camilo Artiga-Purcell at Kiteworks.

  • Surveying Legislative Trends As States Rush To Regulate AI

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    With Congress unlikely to pass comprehensive artificial intelligence legislation any time soon, just four months into 2024, nearly every state has introduced legislation aimed at the development and use of AI on subjects from algorithmic discrimination risk to generative AI disclosures, say David Kappos and Sasha Rosenthal-Larrea at Cravath.

  • How Duty Of Candor Figures In USPTO AI Ethics Guidance

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    The duty of candor and good faith is an important part of the artificial intelligence ethics guidance issued last week by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, and serious consequences can visit patent and trademark applicants who violate that duty, not just their attorneys and agents, says Michael Cicero at Taylor English.

  • Series

    Whitewater Kayaking Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Whether it's seeing clients and their issues from a new perspective, or staying nimble in a moment of intense challenge, the lessons learned from whitewater kayaking transcend the rapids of a river and prepare attorneys for the courtroom and beyond, says Matthew Kent at Alston & Bird.

  • This Earth Day, Consider How Your Firm Can Go Greener

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    As Earth Day approaches, law firms and attorneys should consider adopting more sustainable practices to reduce their carbon footprint — from minimizing single-use plastics to purchasing carbon offsets for air travel — which ultimately can also reduce costs for clients, say M’Lynn Phillips and Lisa Walters at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • Weisselberg's Perjury At Trial Spotlights Atty Ethics Issues

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    Former Trump Organization executive Allen Weisselberg’s recent guilty plea for perjury in the New York attorney general's civil fraud trial should serve as a reminder to attorneys of their ethical duties when they know a client has lied or plans to lie in court, and the potential penalties for not fulfilling those obligations, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • Practicing Law With Parkinson's Disease

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    This Parkinson’s Awareness Month, Adam Siegler at Greenberg Traurig discusses his experience working as a lawyer with Parkinson’s disease, sharing both lessons on how to cope with a diagnosis and advice for supporting colleagues who live with the disease.

  • Why Incorporating By Reference Is Rarely Good Practice

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    The Federal Circuit’s recent ruling in Promptu Systems v. Comcast serves as a reminder that while incorporating by reference may seem efficient, it is generally prohibited by courts and can lead to sanctions when used to bypass a word count limit, says Cullen Seltzer at Sands Anderson.

  • Series

    Playing Hockey Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Nearly a lifetime of playing hockey taught me the importance of avoiding burnout in all aspects of life, and the game ultimately ended up providing me with the balance I needed to maintain success in my legal career, says John Riccione at Taft.

  • For Lawyers, Pessimism Should Be A Job Skill, Not A Life Skill

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    A pessimistic mindset allows attorneys to be effective advocates for their clients, but it can come with serious costs for their personal well-being, so it’s crucial to exercise strategies that produce flexible optimism and connect lawyers with their core values, says Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Trump's NY Civil Fraud Trial Spotlights Long-Criticized Law

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    A New York court’s recent decision holding former President Donald Trump liable for fraud brought old criticisms of the state law used against him back into the limelight — including its strikingly broad scope and its major departures from the traditional elements of common law fraud, say Mark Kelley and Lois Ahn at MoloLamken.

  • Opinion

    Requiring Leave To File Amicus Briefs Is A Bad Idea

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    A proposal to amend the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure that would require parties to get court permission before filing federal amicus briefs would eliminate the long-standing practice of consent filing and thereby make the process less open and democratic, says Lawrence Ebner at the Atlantic Legal Foundation and DRI Center.

  • 4 Ways To Motivate Junior Attorneys To Bring Their Best

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    As Gen Z and younger millennial attorneys increasingly express dissatisfaction with their work and head for the exits, the lawyers who manage them must understand and attend to their needs and priorities to boost engagement and increase retention, says Stacey Schwartz at Katten.

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

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