Immigration

  • January 10, 2024

    Wash. Health Dept. Says GEO Blocking Probe Of ICE Prison

    Washington's health department has alleged in a complaint moved to federal court that private prison operator GEO Group is refusing to let the state investigate hundreds of detainee complaints concerning health and safety issues like unsafe food and solitary confinement misuse.

  • January 09, 2024

    Texas Tells Justices Feds Waived Border Wire Arguments

    Texas urged the U.S. Supreme Court Tuesday to deny the Biden administration's emergency application to vacate a Fifth Circuit order barring federal agents from disturbing wire border barriers, arguing the federal government is belatedly trying to reformulate the case.

  • January 09, 2024

    11th Circ. Won't Let Advocates Argue In DHS Release Appeal

    Legal service providers lost their bid to participate in oral arguments in support of Biden administration migrant parole programs that were blocked by a Florida federal judge, according to a one-line order from the Eleventh Circuit.

  • January 09, 2024

    Biden Admin Close To Finalizing Immigration Fee Increases

    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services' first application fee increases in seven years appear imminent, with the agency sending its final fee schedule to the White House earlier this week.

  • January 09, 2024

    EB-5 Visa Fraud Suit To Stay In Florida State Court

    Two men accused of defrauding millions of dollars from green card hopefuls through a visa program for foreign investors will have to fight allegations in Florida state court after a Florida federal judge refused to send their case to arbitration.

  • January 09, 2024

    Pryor Cashman Names 2 Practice Co-Chairs, Promotes 9 Attys

    Two high-profile partners at midsize transactional and litigation law firm Pryor Cashman LLP have been rewarded with new titles, the firm announced Tuesday.

  • January 08, 2024

    DOL Judge Boots Carnival Operators From H-2B Program

    The U.S. Department of Labor properly barred two traveling carnival companies from hiring foreign workers through the H-2B visa program, an administrative law judge ruled, finding the companies flagrantly violated program rules and then impeded the agency's investigation.

  • January 08, 2024

    Justices Skeptical Of Gov't Mootness Claims In No-Fly Case

    Several U.S. Supreme Court justices expressed skepticism Monday about whether the federal government can moot a lawsuit over a now-rescinded listing on the federal no-fly list when it remains unclear what landed the challenger on the list in the first place.

  • January 08, 2024

    Justices Criticize Feds' Two-Step Removal Notice Scheme

    U.S. Supreme Court justices criticized the Biden administration's position that the first notices to migrants for removal proceedings don't need to contain a hearing time and location, saying Monday the argument would allow the government to issue blank notices.

  • January 08, 2024

    Muslim CBP Officer Says He Was Punished For Keeping Beard

    A Detroit-based Customs and Border Protection officer slapped the federal government with a lawsuit Monday, claiming he was targeted with a bogus investigation into his conduct after pushing back on a supervisor's directive that he shave his beard.

  • January 08, 2024

    Calif. Cold Storage Biz Underpays Migrant Workers, Court Told

    A California cold storage company specializing in packing agricultural goods has not been giving its employees meal or rest breaks or paying overtime wages, a former worker alleged in a proposed class action in federal court, which also lodges claims under federal migrant workers' law.

  • January 08, 2024

    Migrant Loses Bid To Block Potential $358M CFPB Win

    A Texas federal judge has tossed a Honduran woman's bid to prevent the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau from collecting a potential $357.8 million award against an immigration bond company, saying her fear of being detained as a result was too speculative.

  • January 08, 2024

    Justices Won't Review Citizenship Bar Over Legal Pot Biz

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected a Salvadoran's bid to overturn a Ninth Circuit decision that barred her from being naturalized for operating a licensed marijuana business in Washington state.

  • January 08, 2024

    Justices Refuse Atty's Challenge To Border Phone Searches

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to review whether border agents need warrants before searching cellphones at the border, a question posed by a Texas immigration attorney who says he experienced repeated "unreasonable searches" of his work phone.  

  • January 05, 2024

    Judge Ends Immigrant Activists' Free Speech Suit Against ICE

    A Washington federal judge sided with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement in a case about its alleged retaliation against its critics, averting a trial that would have considered whether a Trump-era policy change resulted in the agency targeting prominent immigrant activists.

  • January 05, 2024

    Wash. Judge Gives Final Nod On Asylum-Seeker Settlement

    A Washington federal judge expressed surprise Friday that asylum-seekers accusing officials of dragging out the immigration process were able to strike a deal with the government, saying she would sign a settlement agreement she never anticipated that would tighten some federal deadlines.

  • January 05, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Court Notices, Fees & No Fly List

    The U.S. Supreme Court returns Monday to kick off a new calendar year by hearing arguments over the proper way to notify migrants of immigration court removal procedures, the constitutionality of state legislature-mandated general impact fees and whether prosecutors can present substitute expert witnesses at criminal trials.

  • January 05, 2024

    Grocery Co. Sued After Short-Seller Alleges EB-5 Fraud

    Asian specialty grocery chain Maison Solutions has been hit with a proposed class action alleging its stock price was severely damaged after a third-party research report accused it and its executives of participating in illegal activities, including using supermarkets as a front for immigration fraud.

  • January 04, 2024

    NM Cannabis Regulators Hit 2 Growers With $2M In Fines

    The state of New Mexico's cannabis regulation unit has levied $2 million total in fines against two marijuana-growing operations while stripping them of their licenses, saying they violated a slew of rules governing plant count, cultivation plans, required tracking software and various security measures.

  • January 04, 2024

    NYC Targets Bus Cos. For $708M Texas Migrant Care Costs

    New York City's Department of Social Services claims more than a dozen charter bus companies owe $708 million for the city's expenses providing emergency services to migrants, saying in a lawsuit Thursday that the companies violated state law by transporting migrants from Texas to New York without providing continuing care.

  • January 04, 2024

    Ex-IT Workers Say Precedent Can't Save Spouse Work Permits

    An organization of ex-information technology workers has urged the D.C. Circuit to disregard recent precedent in weighing the group's challenge to an Obama-era program allowing work permits for some spouses of highly skilled foreign workers, saying it conflicts with earlier precedent.

  • January 04, 2024

    Divorce Deal Didn't Erase Dad's Custody, Colo. Panel Finds

    A Colorado appeals panel ruled Thursday that a father can seek his child's return to Mexico under the Hague Abduction Convention, reversing a lower court's finding that he lacked sufficient parental rights to invoke the international pact.

  • January 04, 2024

    Judge Won't Toss CBP Officers' Bid For Overtime Travel Pay

    A U.S. Court of Federal Claims judge allowed specially trained U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers to continue seeking overtime pay for time spent traveling for work, saying the government failed to prove travel time was not compensable.

  • January 03, 2024

    Texas Overstepping With Immigrant Arrest Law, Feds Say

    The Biden administration sued Texas Wednesday to block its controversial new law allowing it to arrest and deport migrants, telling a Texas federal judge the statute is a clear violation of the federal government's mandate to manage immigration.

  • January 03, 2024

    US Agent's Citizenship Marriage Scheme Conviction Tossed

    A U.S. Foreign Service officer and her noncitizen ex-husband had their convictions for fraudulently obtaining his naturalization overturned by the Fourth Circuit, which ruled Wednesday that some of the lies they were charged with couldn't support their guilty verdicts.

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Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Bar Score Is Best Hiring Metric Post-Affirmative Action

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    After the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling striking down affirmative action admissions policies, law firms looking to foster diversity in hiring should view an applicant's Multistate Bar Examination score as the best metric of legal ability — over law school name or GPA, says attorney Alice Griffin.

  • Ghosting In BigLaw: How To Come Back From Lack Of Feedback

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    Junior associates can feel powerless when senior colleagues cut off contact instead of providing useful feedback, but young attorneys can get back on track by focusing on practical professional development and reexamining their career priorities, says Rachel Patterson at Orrick.

  • Pugin Ruling Lowers Bar For Felony-Based Deportation

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Pugin v. Garland that an offense may constitute an obstruction of justice aggravated felony, even when an investigation or proceeding is not pending, may allow the government to seek deportation for other low-level offenses never intended to be grounds for felony-based deportation, says Peter Alfredson at Capital Area Immigrants' Rights Coalition.

  • Steps To Success For Senior Associates

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Adriana Paris at Rissman Barrett discusses the increased responsibilities and opportunities that becoming a senior associate brings and what attorneys in this role should prioritize to flourish in this stressful but rewarding next level in their careers.

  • Legal Profession Must Do More For Lawyers With Disabilities

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    At the start of Disability Pride month, Rosalyn Richter at Arnold & Porter looks at why lawyers with disabilities are significantly underrepresented in private practice, asserting that law firms and other employers must do more to conquer the implicit bias that deters attorneys from seeking accommodations.

  • Opinion

    Appellate Funding Disclosure: No Mandate Is Right Choice

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    The Advisory Committee on Appellate Rules' recent decision, forgoing a mandatory disclosure rule for litigation funding in federal appeals, is prudent, as third-party funding is only involved in a minuscule number of federal cases, and courts have ample authority to obtain funding information if necessary, says Stewart Ackerly at Statera Capital.

  • RETRACTED: How New Prevailing Wage Rule May Affect H-1B Employment

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    Editor's note: This guest article has been removed due to an inaccurate discussion of the status of the U.S. Department of Labor's prevailing wage rule, "Strengthening Wage Protections for the Temporary and Permanent Employment of Certain Aliens in the United States." The rule is no longer on the Biden administration's current rulemaking agenda.

  • Opinion

    Congress Should Pass Bipartisan Immigration Reform Bill

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    By reforming visa allocation, expediting asylum processing, creating new employment visas and creating a path forward for individuals lacking permanent legal status, the recently introduced Dignity Act presents an opportunity for much-needed reform and deserves support from both sides of the aisle, says Laura Reiff at Greenberg Traurig.

  • How Attys Can Avoid Exposing Their Firms To Cyberattacks

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    Attorneys are the weakest link in their firms' cyberdefenses because hackers often exploit the gap between individuals’ work and personal cybersecurity habits, but there are some steps lawyers can take to reduce the risks they create for their employers, say Mark Hurley and Carmine Cicalese at Digital Privacy & Protection.

  • Virginia 'Rocket Docket' Slowdown Is Likely A Blip

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    After being the fastest or second-fastest federal civil trial court for 14 straight years, the Eastern District of Virginia has slid to 18th place, but the rocket docket’s statistical tumble doesn't mean the district no longer maintains a speedy civil docket, says Robert Tata at Hunton.

  • 5 Management Tips To Keep Law Firm Merger Talks Moving

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    Many law firm mergers that make solid business sense still fall apart due to the costs and frustrations of inefficient negotiations, but firm managers can increase the chance of success by effectively planning and executing merger discussions, say Lisa Smith and Kristin Stark at Fairfax Associates.

  • Pay Transparency Laws Complicate Foreign Labor Cert.

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    State and local laws adopted to help close the gender pay gap pose challenges for U.S. companies recruiting foreign nationals, as they try to navigate a thicket of pay transparency laws without running afoul of federally regulated recruitment practices, say Stephanie Pimentel and Asha George at Berry Appleman.

  • Rethinking In-Office Attendance For Associate Retention

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    The hybrid office attendance model doesn't work for all employees, but it does for many — and balancing these two groups is important for associate retention and maintaining a BigLaw firm culture that supports all attorneys, says Summer Eberhard at Major Lindsey.

  • Murdaugh Trials Offer Law Firms Fraud Prevention Reminders

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    As the fraud case against Alex Murdaugh continues to play out, the evidence and narrative presented at his murder trial earlier this year may provide lessons for law firms on implementing robust internal controls that can detect and prevent similar kinds of fraud, say Travis Casner and Helga Zauner at Weaver and Tidwell.

  • Foreign Labor Certification Website Still Structurally Limited

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    Though the U.S. Department of Labor's Office of Foreign Labor Certification has shown encouraging responsiveness in correcting at least one major issue with its online portal, several sources of frustration — including employers' limited access to filed applications — still require fixing, says Michael Morton at Fakhoury Global.

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