Immigration

  • February 20, 2024

    Liberal Justices Hint Chevron Deference Hanging By A Thread

    In the U.S. Supreme Court's latest battle royal over administrative powers, left-leaning justices at oral arguments Tuesday openly suggested that the landmark legal doctrine underpinning modern rulemaking might soon shrivel up, clearing the way for industry-led challenges to regulations on the books for decades.

  • February 20, 2024

    Farms Say Workers Haven't Tied Them To Abusive Tactics

    Two agricultural companies look to escape claims that they trafficked a group of migrant workers, telling a Michigan federal court that the workers hadn't shown how they could have known that a recruiter used abusive tactics to obtain their labor.

  • February 20, 2024

    Developers Deny 'Shell Game' Amid Push For More Sanctions

    Real estate developers facing potential imprisonment over their failure to pay EB-5 investors at least $26 million in settlement and sanction judgments have told an Illinois federal court their money is not hidden in a "shell game" but rather tied up in receivership proceedings the investors already know about.

  • February 20, 2024

    Restoration Architect Says Visa Denial Ignored Evidence

    A Colombian restoration architect who wants to address the affordable housing shortage in the U.S., accused immigration officials in Florida federal court of disregarding more than 1,000 pages of evidence in denying him a national interest waiver for a visa.

  • February 20, 2024

    Permanent Need Dooms Request For H-2B Home Health Aides

    A U.S. Department of Labor appeals board has upheld the rejection of a business's request to hire four home health aides under the H-2B temporary foreign worker program, determining a certifying officer did not act arbitrarily and capriciously in finding the company failed to show its need for workers was temporary.

  • February 20, 2024

    Lack Of Evidence Kills Biz Group's Bid To Hire Foreign Janitors

    A U.S. Department of Labor appeals board shot down a Las Vegas-based Hispanic business group's bid to hire 100 foreign janitors to work during its event season, saying the group failed to hand over evidence to back its seasonal need.

  • February 20, 2024

    GOP Sens. Seek Full Impeachment Trial For Mayorkas

    A group of Senate Republicans made the case on Tuesday that their constitutional duty compels them to hold a full impeachment trial for Alejandro Mayorkas, secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, despite reservations from other Republicans in the Democrat-led Senate.

  • February 16, 2024

    Texas County Says State's Migrant Arrest Law Will Raise Costs

    Texas' Harris County urged a federal court to grant the Biden administration's bid to block an impending state law that would allow Texas to arrest and deport migrants, saying the law, if enforced, would lead to increased jail-related costs.

  • February 16, 2024

    DOL Faulted For Not Explaining Ala. Sonic's H-2B Visa Denial

    A U.S. Department of Labor appeals board has given the operator of an Alabama Sonic Drive-In another chance at temporarily hiring foreign cooks to help out in warm months, ruling that a certifying officer denied an application for the H-2B visa program without a satisfactory explanation.

  • February 16, 2024

    Union Can't Intervene In Fight Over NY Farm Laborers Law

    The United Farm Workers can't intervene in a case over a state law covering protections for agricultural workers, a New York federal judge ruled Friday, saying the union's interests in organizing and upholding the statute won't be harmed.

  • February 16, 2024

    House Lawmakers Unveil $66.3B Military, Border Bill

    A bipartisan group of U.S. House of Representatives lawmakers introduced legislation on Friday that would provide $66.32 billion to support Ukraine, Israel and Taiwan, as well as enact border reforms.

  • February 16, 2024

    Green Card Approvals Sink To All Time Low

    The United States' green card approval rate hit a historic low amid visa caps, with only 3% of those with pending green card applications on track to receive permanent residency in fiscal year 2024, the Cato Institute reported Thursday.

  • February 15, 2024

    GAO Rejects Protests Against ICE Air Charter Deal

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office denied two protests related to the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement solicitation for air charter services for transportation of noncitizens in federal custody, according to two decisions published Thursday.

  • February 15, 2024

    Texas Migrant Arrest Law Needs 'A Lot More Care,' Judge Says

    A Texas federal judge Thursday seemed poised to block a controversial state law that would permit the state to arrest and deport migrants, telling attorneys for the state that the statute may lead to a patchwork of immigration law akin to "the kind of thing the Civil War said you can't do."

  • February 15, 2024

    HHS Watchdog Finds Lax Vetting For Migrant Kid Sponsors

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services was lackadaisical in vetting sponsors taking custody of children who migrated to the U.S. alone and did not always do timely safety checks after their release, according to a report Thursday.

  • February 15, 2024

    9th Circ. Unconvinced That Theft Doesn't Warrant Removal

    A Mexican man fighting deportation after he was convicted of robbery couldn't convince the Ninth Circuit that the state robbery law supporting his conviction was too broad to force his removal.

  • February 15, 2024

    ICE Reaches Settlement Over Mistaken Raid On Couple

    The government has reached a settlement with an elderly Boston woman and the estate of her longtime partner over a mistaken 2019 U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement raid on their apartment by agents who had the wrong address for a suspect, according to a Thursday court filing.

  • February 14, 2024

    NY Judge Sends Migrant Busing Suit Back To State Court

    A state court will hear the New York City social services commissioner's $708 million lawsuit seeking to hold charter companies liable for Texas' migrant busing policies, after a New York federal court ruled Wednesday that the case does not raise federal questions.

  • February 14, 2024

    GOP Senator Wants Confirmation Hearing On Labor Secretary

    Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., called on the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions to hold another hearing on the nomination of Julie Su to the position of secretary of labor, arguing that Su's record as acting secretary deserves public scrutiny.

  • February 14, 2024

    Investors Urge Prison As Developers Seek More Briefing Time

    Two real estate developers on Wednesday asked for more time to respond to EB-5 investors' request that they be imprisoned for hiding their money instead of paying overdue settlements and sanctions judgments, telling an Illinois federal judge their attorney wrote down the court's deadline incorrectly.

  • February 14, 2024

    House Rep. Green Plans Retirement After Mayorkas Fight

    Rep. Mark Green, R-Tenn., chair of the U.S. House Committee on Homeland Security, said Wednesday evening he will not seek reelection, an announcement that comes one day after he led the impeachment of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security secretary.

  • February 14, 2024

    DHS Warns Of Reduced Operations With Budget Shortfall

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is warning it may have to pare back border security initiatives and removal procedures, while green card and asylum backlogs worsen, if Congress doesn't provide additional funding, per a Wednesday email to Law360.

  • February 14, 2024

    Va. Farms Settle H-2A Workers' Allegations Of OT Violations

    A wage dispute lodged by two Mexican farmworkers who accused a Virginia agricultural association and two farms of cheating them and other temporary agricultural workers out of over $2.5 million in overtime pay is now settled, the parties said Wednesday.

  • February 14, 2024

    Deputy AG Warns Of Harsher Penalties For Crimes Aided By AI

    Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco on Wednesday said the U.S. Department of Justice will seek harsher penalties for crimes committed with the aid of artificial intelligence, calling the technology a "double-edged sword" that can be exploited by criminals but utilized by prosecutors with the right controls in place.

  • February 14, 2024

    DOL Extends Deadline For Input On Foreign Worker Jobs

    The U.S. Department of Labor said Wednesday that it is giving the public more time to provide comments on its plan to expand its list of occupations eligible for employment-based green cards based on domestic worker shortages.

promo for immigration policy tracker that says tracking changes in immigration policy

Expert Analysis

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

    Author Photo

    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

    Author Photo

    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

  • Federal Courts And AI Standing Orders: Safety Or Overkill?

    Author Photo

    Several district court judges have issued standing orders regulating the use of artificial intelligence in their courts, but courts should consider following ordinary notice and comment procedures before implementing sweeping mandates that could be unnecessarily burdensome and counterproductive, say attorneys at Curtis.

  • 7 E-Discovery Predictions For 2024 And Beyond

    Author Photo

    The legal and technical issues of e-discovery now affect virtually every lawsuit, and in the year to come, practitioners can expect practices and policies to evolve in a number of ways, from the expanded use of relevancy redactions to mandated information security provisions in protective orders, say attorneys at Littler.

  • 5 Litigation Funding Trends To Note In 2024

    Author Photo

    Over the next year and beyond, litigation funding will continue to evolve in ways that affect attorneys and the larger litigation landscape, from the growth of a secondary market for funded claims, to rising interest rates restricting the availability of capital, says Jeffery Lula at GLS Capital.

  • 4 Legal Ethics Considerations For The New Year

    Author Photo

    As attorneys and clients reset for a new year, now is a good time to take a step back and review some core ethical issues that attorneys should keep front of mind in 2024, including approaching generative artificial intelligence with caution and care, and avoiding pitfalls in outside counsel guidelines, say attorneys at HWG.

  • Perspectives

    Immigration Detention Should Offer Universal Legal Counsel

    Author Photo

    Given the large backlog of immigration court cases and the more than 70% of people in immigration detention without counsel in 2023, the system should establish a universal right to federally funded representation for anyone facing deportation, similar to the public defender model, say Laura Lunn and Shaleen Morales at the Rocky Mountain Immigrant Advocacy Network.

  • What The Law Firm Of The Future Will Look Like

    Author Photo

    As the legal landscape shifts, it’s become increasingly clear that the BigLaw business model must adapt in four key ways to remain viable, from fostering workplace flexibility to embracing technology, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • 4 PR Pointers When Your Case Is In The News

    Author Photo

    Media coverage of new lawsuits exploded last year, demonstrating why defense attorneys should devise a public relations plan that complements their legal strategy, incorporating several objectives to balance ethical obligations and advocacy, say Nathan Burchfiel at Pinkston and Ryan June at Castañeda + Heidelman.

  • Law Firm Strategies For Successfully Navigating 2024 Trends

    Author Photo

    Though law firms face the dual challenge of external and internal pressures as they enter 2024, firms willing to pivot will be able to stand out by adapting to stakeholder needs and reimagining their infrastructure, says Shireen Hilal at Maior Consultants.

  • The Most-Read Legal Industry Law360 Guest Articles Of 2023

    Author Photo

    A range of legal industry topics drew readers' attention in Law360's Expert Analysis section this year, from associate retention strategies to ethical billing practices.

  • Attorneys' Busiest Times Can Be Business Opportunities

    Author Photo

    Attorneys who resolve to grow their revenue and client base in 2024 should be careful not to abandon their goals when they get too busy with client work, because these periods of zero bandwidth can actually be a catalyst for future growth, says Amy Drysdale at Alchemy Consulting.

  • In The World Of Legal Ethics, 10 Trends To Note From 2023

    Author Photo

    Lucian Pera at Adams and Reese and Trisha Rich at Holland & Knight identify the top legal ethics trends from 2023 — including issues related to hot documents, artificial intelligence and cybersecurity — that lawyers should be aware of to put their best foot forward.

  • What's Ahead For Immigrant Employee Rights Enforcement

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Department of Justice’s increased enforcement related to immigration-based employment discrimination is coupled with pending constitutional challenges to administrative tribunals, suggesting employers should leverage those headwinds when facing investigations or class action-style litigation, say attorneys at Jones Day.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Immigration archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!