Georgia

  • May 14, 2024

    Cannabis Co., Wrigley Heir Settle $7M Investor Suit

    An investor that sank $7.4 million into cannabis operator Parallel has settled its suit with the company and its former CEO and heir to the Wrigley chewing gum fortune, according to a mediation report filed in Florida federal court.

  • May 14, 2024

    Ga. Atty Disbarred For Trying To Steal $3M Settlement

    The Georgia Supreme Court announced Tuesday that an Atlanta-area elder law and real estate attorney was disbarred because he conspired with online fraudsters to try to steal a $3 million settlement from an insurance company to its policyholder.

  • May 14, 2024

    Boeing Can't Beat Rival's Trade Secrets Claim, 11th Circ. Hints

    Counsel for Boeing attempted to convince the Eleventh Circuit on Tuesday that a rival aircraft company's bid to claim unjust enrichment amid a long-running U.S. Air Force contract fight should be barred by contract language that waived claims for damages stemming from Boeing's allegedly underhanded bidding tactics.

  • May 14, 2024

    Giuliani, For Now, Can't Appeal Defamation Verdict In Ch. 11

    A New York bankruptcy judge on Tuesday denied Rudy Giuliani's bid to lift his bankruptcy's automatic stay so he can challenge a $148 million defamation verdict, saying the Republican firebrand needs to make more progress in his Chapter 11 and chiding him for repeating false accusations about two former Georgia poll workers.

  • May 14, 2024

    'Come On, Counsel!': 11th Circ. Scoffs At Ga. District's Appeal

    The Eleventh Circuit appeared dubious Tuesday that an Atlanta-area school district had standing to appeal a district court's order demanding the Georgia Legislature redraw a map found to be racially gerrymandered, with at least one judge casting aspersions on the school district's motives for pressing the appeal.

  • May 14, 2024

    Ga. Appeals Court Weighs Validity Of 190-Year-Old Land Grant

    A company seeking to "restore and conserve" approximately 1,000 acres of coastal marshland told Georgia Court of Appeals on Tuesday that the state is attempting to renege on a 190-year-old property grant and take back the land simply because it may soon be worth more than $100 million.

  • May 14, 2024

    States, Elec. Co-Op Seek To Block EPA Power Plant GHG Rule

    A group of 25 red states and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association asked the D.C. Circuit to block the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from implementing its new power plant greenhouse gas emissions rule while they challenge its legality.

  • May 14, 2024

    Ga. Justices Wary Of Gov't Listening To Atty-Client Calls

    The Georgia Supreme Court seemed inclined during oral arguments Tuesday to find that a man convicted of assault had his Sixth Amendment rights violated because a detective and a prosecutor listened to his jailhouse phone calls with his attorney.

  • May 13, 2024

    11th Circ. Says Class Attys Self-Dealt In $35M TCPA Settlement

    The Eleventh Circuit on Monday dismissed a proposed $35 million settlement of a class action alleging GoDaddy.com violated the Telephone Consumer Protection Act by sending unwanted marketing texts, saying the deal may have come by through nefarious means.

  • May 13, 2024

    Challenger Says Ga. Justice Is 'Working The Refs'

    Georgia Supreme Court candidate John Barrow accused his incumbent opponent on Monday of "working the refs" and capitalizing on the prospect that Barrow could face discipline for running on a platform that is stridently in favor of abortion rights in his bid for a seat on the state's highest court.

  • May 13, 2024

    Corp. Transparency Act An Overbroad Dragnet, 11th Circ. Told

    Congress exceeded its authority in passing the Corporate Transparency Act, which prompted the U.S. Treasury Department to solicit personal information for law enforcement purposes from those that registered and owned state-registered entities, a small-business group told the Eleventh Circuit on Monday.

  • May 13, 2024

    Zuckerberg Challenges Basis Of Personal Claims In Meta MDL

    Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg is asking a California federal court to throw out claims against him in multidistrict litigation over social media platforms' allegedly addictive design, saying the personal injury plaintiffs haven't shown he took affirmative actions that would make him personally liable.

  • May 13, 2024

    Ga. Dental Imaging Co. Pushes For Ax Of X-Ray IP Row

    A dental imaging company is urging a Georgia federal judge to slash a suit lodged against it by a competitor alleging that the company sold 3D dental imaging systems and software that infringe its patents, arguing that the claims are directed to "abstract ideas" that are ineligible for patent protection.

  • May 13, 2024

    11th Circ. Says Ga. County's Trans Health Ban Violates Title VII

    A split Eleventh Circuit panel upheld a win Monday for a transgender sheriff's deputy who challenged a Georgia county health plan's refusal to pay for gender-affirmation surgery, ruling the coverage exclusion violated federal anti-discrimination law.

  • May 13, 2024

    FEMA Wrongly Denied Atlanta $1.2M In Funds, City Says

    Atlanta has slapped the Federal Emergency Management Agency with a complaint in Georgia federal court accusing the agency of wrongly denying the city's challenge of its rejected request for more than $1.2 million in public assistance to repair damage to a wastewater treatment plant.

  • May 13, 2024

    Arena Football Contract Row Ends With Settlement

    After a monthslong dispute over an arena football team's decision to drop out of its former league to join a rival, upstart organization, the league said Friday that it had reached a settlement to end its litigation against the breakaway West Texas Desert Hawks.

  • May 13, 2024

    Ga. Judicial Candidate Asks State High Court To Review DQ

    A woman who had been running to take the seat of the judge overseeing the Georgia election interference case has asked the state's supreme court to review a recent ruling striking her from the ballot.

  • May 13, 2024

    Ga. Election Workers Ask Court To Stop Giuliani's Lies

    Two Georgia poll workers have asked a New York federal bankruptcy judge to bar Rudy Giuliani from continuing to repeat the same "malicious" false claims that led a jury to award them $148 million last year because of the former New York City mayor's lies that the pair committed ballot fraud during the 2020 presidential election.

  • May 10, 2024

    Walmart Must Pay $1M Injury Verdict, Ga. Appeals Court Says

    The Georgia Court of Appeals won't give Walmart a way out of a $1 million verdict owed to a woman injured in a store in 2018, dispatching Friday with the retail chain's argument that the verdict was blatantly excessive.

  • May 10, 2024

    Fox Theatre Let Sex Harassment Go Unchecked, Suit Says

    A former worker at Atlanta's Fox Theatre filed a lawsuit this week accusing the historic venue of allowing sexual harassment to run rampant among its ranks, refusing to discipline employees who made lewd comments — and worse — while retaliating against those who complained.

  • May 10, 2024

    Off The Bench: Ohtani Translator's Plea, NBA Star Tops Agent

    In this week's Off The Bench, Shohei Ohtani's ex-interpreter will plead guilty, an NBA star wins in his clash with the agent who sought to represent him, and a tennis player who was abused by her former coach is awarded $9 million.

  • May 10, 2024

    Tobacco Wholesaler Must Post $1.4M Bond Pending IP Appeal

    A cigarette rolling paper wholesaler must post a more than $1.4 million bond while the company appeals its portion of a larger $2.3 million verdict for selling counterfeit papers, a Georgia federal judge has ruled.

  • May 10, 2024

    Ga. Dept. Of Law, Ex-Paralegal Settle Race Discrimination Suit

    A Georgia federal judge has closed a former paralegal's discrimination and retaliation case against the Georgia Department of Law and a former deputy attorney general now working as a Cobb County Superior Court judge, saying a settlement has been reached. 

  • May 10, 2024

    Financial Tech Co. Wants New Trial In $7.8M Breach Suit

    A financial technology company ordered to pay more than $7.8 million to an Atlanta-area capital recruiting firm for violating an agreement to pay the recruiter to connect it with investors has asked a Georgia federal judge for either a new trial or judgment as a matter of law.

  • May 10, 2024

    The Week In Trump: All Eyes On NY As Other Cases Lag

    Donald Trump's Manhattan hush money trial took center stage with dramatic testimony from adult film actress Stormy Daniels, while the former president's criminal cases in Georgia and Florida ran into delays that could last through Election Day.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • Stay Interviews Are Key To Retaining Legal Talent

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    Even as the economy shifts and layoffs continue, law firms still want to retain their top attorneys, and so-called stay interviews — informal conversations with employees to identify potential issues before they lead to turnover — can be a crucial tool for improving retention and morale, say Tina Cohen Nicol and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • A Defense Strategy For Addressing Copyright Fee-Shifting

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    Permissive fee-shifting under Section 505 of the Copyright Act poses unique challenges for copyright defendants, carrying an outsize impact on the economic incentive structure in copyright litigation, but relying on a Federal Rule of Civil Procedure may offer a potential solution by allowing defendants to recover attorney fees, say Hugh Marbury and Molly Shaffer at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Series

    Spray Painting Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experiences as an abstract spray paint artist have made me a better litigator, demonstrating — in more ways than one — how fluidity and flexibility are necessary parts of a successful legal practice, says Erick Sandlin at Bracewell.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Is Imperative This Election Year

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    As the next election nears, the judges involved in the upcoming trials against former President Donald Trump increasingly face political pressures and threats of violence — revealing the urgent need to safeguard judicial independence and uphold the rule of law, says Benes Aldana at the National Judicial College.

  • Series

    Riding My Peloton Bike Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Using the Peloton platform for cycling, running, rowing and more taught me that fostering a mind-body connection will not only benefit you physically and emotionally, but also inspire stamina, focus, discipline and empathy in your legal career, says Christopher Ward at Polsinelli.

  • The Challenges SEC's Climate Disclosure Rule May Face

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    Attorneys at Debevoise examine potential legal challenges to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's new climate-related disclosure rule — against which nine suits have already been filed — including arguments under the Administrative Procedure Act, the major questions doctrine, the First Amendment and the nondelegation doctrine.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: March Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses four notable circuit court decisions on topics from consumer fraud to employment — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including coercive communications with putative class members and Article III standing at the class certification stage.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

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    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • What Recent Study Shows About AI's Promise For Legal Tasks

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    Amid both skepticism and excitement about the promise of generative artificial intelligence in legal contexts, the first randomized controlled trial studying its impact on basic lawyering tasks shows mixed but promising results, and underscores the need for attorneys to proactively engage with AI, says Daniel Schwarcz at University of Minnesota Law School.

  • Avoiding Jurisdictional Risks From Execs' Remote Work

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    Following a California federal court's recent decision in Evans v. Cardlytics — where the case was remanded to state court because the company’s executives worked remotely in California — there are several steps employers can take to ensure they will not be exposed to unfavored jurisdictions, says Eric Fox at Quarles & Brady.

  • 11th Circ. FMLA Ruling Deepens Divide Over Causation

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    The Eleventh Circuit's recent ruling in Lapham v. Walgreen distinguishes the circuit as the loudest advocate for the but-for causation standard for assessing Family and Medical Leave Act retaliation claims, though employers in other jurisdictions may encounter less favorable standards and the U.S. Supreme Court will likely have to address the circuit split eventually, say attorneys at Benesch.

  • Business Litigators Have A Source Of Untapped Fulfillment

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    As increasing numbers of attorneys struggle with stress and mental health issues, business litigators can find protection against burnout by remembering their important role in society — because fulfillment in one’s work isn’t just reserved for public interest lawyers, say Bennett Rawicki and Peter Bigelow at Hilgers Graben.

  • Series

    Skiing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    A lifetime of skiing has helped me develop important professional skills, and taught me that embracing challenges with a spirit of adventure can allow lawyers to push boundaries, expand their capabilities and ultimately excel in their careers, says Andrea Przybysz at Tucker Ellis.

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