Florida

  • February 13, 2024

    Fla. Judge Drops Bid To Avoid Depo In Rival's Ethics Case

    A Florida state appellate judge told the state's highest court Tuesday he will comply with a disciplinary panel's order for him to sit for a deposition in an ethics case against a former campaign rival.

  • February 13, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    A pizza chain, an energy company, a medical-device maker and a Manila casino were all hit with book-and-record demands last week in Delaware's Court of Chancery. A shoe company also walked away from a shareholder suit, two cryptocurrency companies tallied the costs of a broken merger, and three cigarette giants argued over Florida settlement payments.

  • February 13, 2024

    McCarter & English Grows In Miami With Levine Kellogg Atty

    A former Levine Kellogg Lehman Schneider + Grossman LLP litigation and alternative dispute resolution attorney has joined McCarter & English LLP as a partner in Miami, the firm announced Tuesday.

  • February 12, 2024

    Fla. High Court Won't Expedite Redistricting Challenge

    The Florida Supreme Court on Monday refused to expedite the appeal of a new congressional district map that voting groups say eliminated a majority Black voting district and violates the state constitution.

  • February 12, 2024

    Judge Orders Arbitration In Fla. Doctor's New Contract Claim

    A doctor who says he faced retaliation from companies he had contracted with after objecting to violations of the False Claims Act must take his newest allegations to arbitration, a Florida federal judge ruled Monday, rejecting the physician's argument that one of the defendants had waived its arbitration rights.

  • February 12, 2024

    TradeStation Fined By FINRA For Supervisory Failures

    Broker-dealer TradeStation Securities agreed to pay $700,000 to the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority to settle claims that it failed to properly use anti-money laundering programs to alert the firm of suspicious trading by its customers, and that it did not implement proper procedures for the sales of certain securities.

  • February 12, 2024

    Ex-CEO Of Health Co. Found Guilty Of Fraud After $195M Loss

    An Illinois federal jury on Monday found the former chief executive officer of a healthcare company guilty on all 13 criminal charges brought by the federal government alleging his company tricked consumers into purchasing health insurance that didn't cover what the company promised.

  • February 12, 2024

    Real Estate Co. Asks NC High Court To Review Shutdown

    A real estate company wants the North Carolina Supreme Court to review a lower court's decision to block the company from operating in the state after finding that it fraudulently locked homeowners into high-interest loans.

  • February 12, 2024

    Fla. Migrant Transport Suit Halted For Injunction Ruling

    A Florida federal judge on Sunday paused a suit by immigrant rights advocates against state officials challenging a law that makes transporting unauthorized immigrants a crime, staying the case until he decides whether to temporarily block the law.

  • February 12, 2024

    2 Jurors Say They Were Pressured To Convict Ex-BVI Premier

    Two Florida jurors who helped convict Andrew Fahie, a former premier of the British Virgin Islands, on drug trafficking-related charges came forward shortly after they were discharged Thursday to say they were pressured to vote guilty, putting the case in what the judge called the "worst-case scenario" at a hearing Monday.

  • February 12, 2024

    Fla. Van Gogh Café Sued Over Artist's Name In Tea Products

    A Van Gogh exhibition has urged a New York federal judge to issue a declaration that it is not infringing a Florida café's trademark for a tea product in the artist's name, saying in a lawsuit that the business' rights are weak and consumers are unlikely to be confused.

  • February 12, 2024

    Biden Signs Law To Protect Servicemembers' Personal Info

    President Joe Biden signed into law a bipartisan bill that aims to protect the personally identifiable information of servicemembers when their private household goods are shipped internationally. 

  • February 12, 2024

    Energy Drink Co.'s Ch. 11 Stayed As Ex-CEO Seeks Tax Docs

    A Florida bankruptcy judge has stayed the Chapter 11 case of the company that makes Bang energy drinks while its founder and former CEO waits for the Internal Revenue Service to provide tax documents linked to a PepsiCo transaction that were previously denied from him by the court.

  • February 12, 2024

    Fla. High Court Pulled Into Depo Fight Between State Judges

    A Florida state appellate judge is asking the Sunshine State's high court to review a disciplinary panel's decision requiring him to sit for a deposition in an ethics case against a former campaign rival, saying it would do him "irreparable" harm and set a dangerous precedent for other judges.

  • February 12, 2024

    Fla. Atty Wants $300K COVID Relief Fraud Conviction Axed

    A Florida attorney convicted of conspiring to defraud a U.S. coronavirus pandemic relief program has asked a Georgia federal judge to vacate the jury's guilty verdict and either acquit her or order a new trial, arguing the government violated her due process rights by not submitting sufficient evidence to prove her guilt.

  • February 12, 2024

    Martin Marietta Paying $2B For Blue Water Raw Materials Ops

    Cravath-advised building materials supplier Martin Marietta Materials Inc. said Monday it has agreed to buy 20 active aggregate operations across five states from Blue Water Industries LLC, represented by Wachtell Lipton, for $2.05 billion in cash. 

  • February 11, 2024

    Rise In Billing For Catheters May Signal $2B Medicare Fraud

    Seven companies may have fraudulently billed Medicare by as much as $2 billion over two years for medical supplies that were never requested or received, according to an analysis by a Washington, D.C.-based group representing healthcare providers.

  • February 09, 2024

    Real Estate Authority: Neumann's WeWork Reboot?

    Law360 Real Estate Authority covers the most important real estate deals, litigation, policies and trends. Catch up on this week's key developments in California, Florida and New York — as well as the obstacles WeWork founder Adam Neumann faces if he tries to reclaim the struggling company that ousted him.

  • February 09, 2024

    SEC's 'Orwellian' Trade Database Is Unlawful, 11th Circ. Told

    Citadel Securities LLC and the American Securities Association have laid out their objections to a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission directive that requires brokerage firms to fund the buildup of a database known as the consolidated audit trail, telling the Eleventh Circuit that the tool created an "Orwellian surveillance regime" that puts American investors at risk of being hacked.

  • February 09, 2024

    Fla. Judge Won't Halt Alleged 'Payback' By Miami Official

    A Florida federal judge on Friday declined to issue an injunction against a Miami city commissioner who's accused of continuing his campaign of retaliation against two business owners despite a $63.5 million judgment against him for the same conduct, saying the proposed order is too vague.

  • February 09, 2024

    Cigar Co. Doesn't Own 'Dragon' TM, Rival's Dismissal Bid Says

    The defendant in a trademark infringement suit from a cigar company has asked a Florida federal court to dismiss the case, saying that the plaintiff doesn't even own the registered marks it claims were infringed.

  • February 09, 2024

    Costco Sold Listeria-Contaminated Chicken Wraps, Suit Says

    A customer who alleges he fell ill and was hospitalized after eating chicken wraps contaminated with listeria that he bought from Costco filed a putative class action against Costco and two food manufacturers in Florida federal court Friday, asserting claims for negligence and unfair trade practices.

  • February 09, 2024

    FSU Board Demands Dismissal Of ACC's Preemptive Suit

    Florida State University is pushing for the dismissal of the Atlantic Coast Conference's North Carolina state lawsuit, saying it was prematurely filed to preempt the university's own suit against the conference, in an attempt to win a "race to the courthouse" and in violation of the conference's own rules.

  • February 09, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Backs Gov't Win In Fla. University's Patent Dispute

    A Federal Circuit panel has affirmed the rejection of a Florida university's infringement suit against the U.S. government over its patent on lab mice used to study Alzheimer's disease, ruling the 1980 law governing patents developed through federally funded research can apply to work that predates a funding agreement.

  • February 09, 2024

    Jewish Divorce Can't Shield Spouse From $21.8M Order In Fla.

    Florida appellate judges have denied a petition by the owner of a moving company to review an order compelling him to provide financial information to satisfy a $21.8 million judgment in connection with deceptive business practices, after a lower court said a religious divorce didn't preclude his wife from disclosing assets.

Expert Analysis

  • An Overview Of Circuit Courts' Interlocutory Motion Standards

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    The Federal Arbitration Act allows litigants to file an immediate appeal from an order declining to enforce an arbitration agreement, but the circuit courts differ on the specific requirements for the underlying order as well as which motion must be filed, as demonstrated in several 2023 decisions, says Kristen Mueller at Mueller Law.

  • The Case For Post-Bar Clerk Training Programs At Law Firms

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    In today's competitive legal hiring market, an intentionally designed training program for law school graduates awaiting bar admission can be an effective way of creating a pipeline of qualified candidates, says Brent Daub at Gilson Daub.

  • Attorneys Have An Ethical Duty To Protect The Judiciary

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    The tenor of public disagreement and debate has become increasingly hostile against judges, and though the legislative branch is trying to ameliorate this safety gap, lawyers have a moral imperative and professional requirement to stand with judges in defusing attacks against them and their rulings, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • AI Can Help Lawyers Overcome The Programming Barrier

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    Legal professionals without programming expertise can use generative artificial intelligence to harness the power of automation and other technology solutions to streamline their work, without the steep learning curve traditionally associated with coding, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Preparing Law Students For A New, AI-Assisted Legal World

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    As artificial intelligence rapidly transforms the legal landscape, law schools must integrate technology and curricula that address AI’s innate challenges — from ethics to data security — to help students stay ahead of the curve, say Daniel Garrie at Law & Forensics, Ryan Abbott at JAMS and Karen Silverman at Cantellus Group.

  • General Counsel Need Data Literacy To Keep Up With AI

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    With the rise of accessible and powerful generative artificial intelligence solutions, it is imperative for general counsel to understand the use and application of data for myriad important activities, from evaluating the e-discovery process to monitoring compliance analytics and more, says Colin Levy at Malbek.

  • Young Thug Case Spotlights Debate Over Lyric Admissibility

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    A Georgia court’s recent ruling, allowing prosecutors to use some of rapper Young Thug’s lyrics in his conspiracy trial, captures the ongoing debate about whether rap lyrics are admissible, with courts often stretching the boundaries of the federal evidence rules, say Amy Buice at Smith Gambrell and Emily Ward at Continuum Legal Group.

  • Navigating Discovery Of Generative AI Information

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools become increasingly ubiquitous, companies must make sure to preserve generative AI data when there is reasonable expectation of litigation, and to include transcripts in litigation hold notices, as they may be relevant to discovery requests, say Nick Peterson and Corey Hauser at Wiley.

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

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    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • How Fla. Bankruptcy Ruling May Affect Equity Owners

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    A Florida bankruptcy court’s recent ruling in Vital Pharmaceuticals — which rejected the Third Circuit’s Majestic Star decision that determined a bankrupt corporation’s flow-through status was not protected by the automatic stay — may significantly affect how equity owners can mitigate the impact of flow-through structures in bankruptcy, say Eric Behl-Remijan and Natasha Hwangpo at Ropes & Gray.

  • Cos.' Trade Secret Measures Must Adjust To Remote-Work Era

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    Several recent cases demonstrate that companies need to reevaluate and adjust their trade secret protection strategies in this new age of remote work, says Stephanie Riley at Womble Bond.

  • Safe-Harbor Period Change Could Hinder TCPA Compliance

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    A proposed rule change under consideration by the Federal Communications Commission would require businesses to honor do-not-call requests within 24 hours of receipt for calls and texts that are subject to the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, and companies have already called it unreasonable, say Aaron Weiss and Danny Enjamio at Carlton Fields.

  • How Justices Could Rule On A Key Copyright Statute

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    Attorneys at Manatt discuss how the U.S. Supreme Court may choose to address a fundamental accrual issue in Warner Chappell Music v. Nealy, which precedents the court may look to in analyzing the issue and the challenges copyright claimants may face going forward.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

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    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Insurers Should Prepare For 'Black Swan' Climate Disasters

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    As rapid climate change results in increased risk of casualties and property loss from rare, severe weather events, the insurance industry should take five crucial steps toward evolving and continuing operations, including advanced analytic techniques and investments in alternative energy sources, say Stephen Brown and Irena Maier at Wilson Elser.

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