Employment

  • May 23, 2024

    Wash. Atty Stops Practicing Law After Assaulting Associate

    A family law attorney in Washington state has resigned from practicing law after a series of criminal offenses, including a misdemeanor sexual assault and an attempted hate crime involving a colleague after a work-sponsored event, according to state bar association disciplinary records made public this week.

  • May 23, 2024

    Conn. To Expand Paid Sick Leave To Smaller Businesses

    More employees in Connecticut will soon become eligible for paid sick leave after the state's governor gave his blessing on a bill that expands the state's time-off requirements to include smaller businesses.

  • May 23, 2024

    LA Jury Awards $58M To Train Yard Worker Injured In Slip

    A train yard worker was awarded over $58 million this week by a Los Angeles jury due to an injury that he says occurred when he slipped on top of a wet train car, which resulted in a fractured foot and a diagnosis of complex regional pain syndrome. 

  • May 23, 2024

    Biden Renominates NLRB Chair, Taps Republican For Vacancy

    President Joe Biden on Thursday announced he intends to renominate Lauren McFerran to continue serving as chair of the National Labor Relations Board, while also tapping a Seyfarth Shaw LLP partner to fill a long-vacant Republican seat on the board.

  • May 23, 2024

    Legal Marketer, Ark. Firm Agree To End Trade Secrets Suit

    A legal marketing business has agreed to dismiss a Georgia federal lawsuit accusing an Arkansas law firm and others of stealing and profiting off its trade secrets, including a database of client leads for mass torts over talcum powder and heartburn medication.

  • May 23, 2024

    Amazon Workers' $5.5M COVID Screening Deal Gets Initial OK

    A California federal magistrate judge on Wednesday gave her preliminary blessing to a $5.5 million settlement Amazon agreed to pay to a class of 250,000 employees who accused the digital retail behemoth of failing to pay for time spent undergoing mandatory COVID-19 screenings before their shifts.

  • May 23, 2024

    NCAA Can't Move Colo. Athlete Pay Case

    A Colorado federal judge on Thursday rejected a bid by the National Collegiate Athletic Association and collegiate athletic conferences to move athletes' compensation allegations to California, where two similar cases are being heard, highlighting the choice by named plaintiffs to have their claims heard in Colorado.

  • May 23, 2024

    Alaska Airlines, Union Beat Fired Workers' Religious Bias Suit

    A Washington federal judge tossed a suit from two Christian flight attendants who said they were illegally fired by Alaska Airlines and abandoned by their labor union for opposing the airline's support for LGBTQ+ rights, ruling there's no proof unlawful bias cost them their jobs.

  • May 23, 2024

    NYC Mayor And Assault Accuser Spar Over Discovery 'Theatrics'

    The first conference in a lawsuit alleging New York City Mayor Eric Adams sexually assaulted a Police Department colleague in 1991 grew heated Thursday, as attorneys on both sides accused the others of improper discovery gambits.

  • May 23, 2024

    Jackson Lewis Questions Role In Wage Suit After Ch. 11

    Jackson Lewis PC attorneys were unsure if they were able to keep representing more than a dozen Pennsylvania nursing homes as an unpaid-wage case approaches a critical deadline, telling a federal court during a conference Thursday that the Bankruptcy Code suspended their service to a group of defendants who filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy earlier in May.

  • May 23, 2024

    Ambulance Co. Owner Accused Of $1M Pandemic Loan Fraud

    The owner of a California ambulance company who was charged last year with tax evasion and filing false returns has been further accused of fraudulently securing $1 million from federal pandemic relief loan programs, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • May 23, 2024

    Fisher Phillips Reinforces Calif. Labor And Employment Team

    Fisher Phillips has hired two of counsel in its Irvine, California, office to continue representing employers and helping those clients navigate a range of labor and employment matters.

  • May 23, 2024

    Philly-Area Home Health Co.'s OT Settlement Gets First Nod

    A Pennsylvania federal judge gave an early nod to a deal resolving a proposed class of nurses' overtime suit against a Philadelphia nursing home that allegedly failed to pay its in-home care workers the proper rates for overtime in violation of both state and federal wage laws.

  • May 23, 2024

    Wow Such Basic: Justices Back Crypto Fans In Dogecoin Duel

    It's up to judges, not arbitrators, to figure out whether contracts between businesses and consumers have subtly superseded earlier agreements to hash out disputes in arbitration rather than litigation, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Thursday.

  • May 22, 2024

    Wash. Health System Wants $230M Worker Class Win Axed

    A Washington hospital system is seeking to derail a nearly $230 million judgement in favor of workers in a class wage case, contending the plaintiffs' key expert who testified at a state court trial recommended that jurors calculate damages based on a flawed equation that didn't account for differences in pay classifications.

  • May 22, 2024

    Ex-Google Manager Says He Lost Job For Reporting Nepotism

    A former Google senior manager has sued the search giant in California state court, claiming he was fired for reporting on superiors using their positions to secure sought-after spots for their children in Google's apprentice program.

  • May 22, 2024

    Conn. Judge Doubts Restaurant's Insurance Beef Is Stale

    Connecticut's chief intermediate appellate court judge appeared skeptical Wednesday of Liberty Mutual Insurance Co.'s position that a restaurant is barred from suing over the denial of coverage for a worker's hand injury, suggesting that previous litigation over the worker's compensation policy has no bearing on the current suit. 

  • May 22, 2024

    Ex-Citi Exec Says She Was Asked To Lie To OCC

    A former Citibank NA managing director hired to bring the bank into compliance with regulatory obligations has accused the bank and its chief operating officer of wrongful termination and retaliation in a suit Wednesday, alleging she was fired for not reporting false information to authorities.

  • May 22, 2024

    CBRE Calls Exec's Noncompete Right Fit In A Small World

    A Texas appellate court wondered Wednesday whether a temporary injunction that seemingly bars a former CBRE executive from working in his trade anywhere in the world goes too far, and questioned the validity of the underlying noncompete agreement at the center of the legal battle.

  • May 22, 2024

    IT Co. Can't Sink Fired Worker's FMLA Retaliation Suit

    A Florida federal judge declined to hand an information technology company an early win in a former worker's suit claiming he was fired after he took medical leave to treat anxiety, ruling that there are enough disputes over whether the company acted illegally to send the case to trial.

  • May 22, 2024

    Likely NCAA Deal Negates Need For Transfer, Athletes Say

    Athletes suing the National Collegiate Athletics Association in Colorado over compensation rules have told a Colorado federal judge that the NCAA may have undermined its own bid to transfer the suit to California, citing recent news reports that the NCAA is in settlement talks in two other cases in the Northern District of California.

  • May 22, 2024

    Justices' CFPB Alliance May Save SEC Courts, Not Chevron

    A four-justice concurrence to the U.S. Supreme Court's decision upholding the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's unique funding scheme last week carries implications for other cases pending before the court that challenge the so-called administrative state, or the permanent cadre of regulatory agencies and career government enforcers who hold sway over vast swaths of American economic life.

  • May 22, 2024

    Ex-Mich. Judge Loses Law License Challenge

    A former Detroit trial court judge's failure to object to a magistrate judge's recommendation to toss her claims means she cannot continue to pursue a discrimination and defamation complaint against the state's judicial disciplinary board, a federal judge in Michigan ruled Wednesday.

  • May 22, 2024

    Carpenter Sues Union Healthcare Plan After Losing Coverage

    A union healthcare plan violated the Employee Retirement Income Security Act when it stopped working with a Bay Area insulation company whose union contract expired, a new proposed class action filed in California federal court alleges.

  • May 22, 2024

    Ga. Hospital Says Own Bylaws Are Not Grounds For Suit

    Counsel for a major Georgia hospital urged a state appellate court Wednesday to shut down a lawsuit from a doctor who said the medical center poached his patients, arguing that the hospital gets to "enjoy broad authority" about whom its doctors treat.

Expert Analysis

  • FTC Noncompete Rule's Impact On Healthcare Nonprofits

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    Healthcare entities that are nonprofit or tax-exempt and thus outside of the pending Federal Trade Commission noncompete rule's reach should evaluate a number of potential risk factors and impacts, starting by assessing their own status, say Ben Shook and Tania Archer at Moore & Van Allen.

  • Trump Hush Money Case Offers Master Class In Trial Strategy

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    The New York criminal hush money trial of former President Donald Trump typifies some of the greatest challenges that lawyers face in crafting persuasive presentations, providing lessons on how to handle bad facts, craft a simple story that withstands attack, and cross-examine with that story in mind, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • Why Employers Shouldn't Overreact To Protest Activities

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    Recent decisions from the First Circuit in Kinzer v. Whole Foods and the National Labor Relations Board in Home Depot hold eye-opening takeaways about which employee conduct is protected as "protest activity" and make a case for fighting knee-jerk reactions that could result in costly legal proceedings, says Frank Shuster at Constangy.

  • Series

    Teaching Yoga Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Being a yoga instructor has helped me develop my confidence and authenticity, as well as stress management and people skills — all of which have crossed over into my career as an attorney, says Laura Gongaware at Clyde & Co.

  • Best Practices To Accommodate Workplace Service Animals

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Since the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission recently pledged to enforce accommodations for people with intellectual, developmental and mental health-related disabilities, companies should use an interactive process to properly respond when employees ask about bringing service animals into the workplace, say Samuel Lillard and Jantzen Mace at Ogletree.

  • A Vision For Economic Clerkships In The Legal System

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    As courts handle increasingly complex damages analyses involving vast amounts of data, an economic clerkship program — integrating early-career economists into the judicial system — could improve legal outcomes and provide essential training to clerks, say Mona Birjandi at Data for Decisions and Matt Farber at Secretariat.

  • Examining Illinois Genetic Privacy Law Amid Deluge Of Claims

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    After a federal court certified an Illinois Genetic Information Privacy Act class action in August, claims under the law have skyrocketed, so employers, insurers and others that collect health and genetic information should ensure compliance with the act to limit litigation risk, say attorneys at Squire Patton.

  • 7 Effects Of DOL Retirement Asset Manager Exemption Rule

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    The recent U.S. Department of Labor amendment to the retirement asset manager exemption delivers several key practical impacts, including the need for managers, as opposed to funds, to register with the DOL, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Kansas Workers' Comp. Updates Can Benefit Labor, Business

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    While the most significant shake-up from the April amendment to the Kansas Workers Compensation Act will likely be the increase in potential lifetime payouts for workers totally disabled on the job, other changes that streamline the hearing process will benefit both employees and companies, says Weston Mills at Gilson Daub.

  • Protecting IP May Be Tricky Without Noncompetes

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    Contrary to the Federal Trade Commission's view, trade secret law cannot replace noncompetes' protection of proprietary information because intellectual property includes far more than just trade secrets, so businesses need to closely examine their IP protection options, say Aimee Fagan and Ching-Lee Fukuda at Sidley.

  • How FTC's Noncompete Rule May Affect Exec Comp Packages

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    In the event the Federal Trade Commission's final noncompete rule goes into effect as currently contemplated, companies will need to take stock of how they structure post-employment executive compensation arrangements, such as severance agreements and clawbacks, says Meredith O'Leary at King & Spalding.

  • 8 Legal Issues Influencing Investors In The Creator Economy

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    The rapidly expanding digital creator economy — funding for which more than doubled in the U.S. in the first quarter — comes with its own set of unique legal issues investors must carefully consider before diving in, say Louis Lehot and Alan Pate at Foley & Lardner.

  • E-Discovery Quarterly: Recent Rulings On Text Message Data

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    Electronically stored information on cellphones, and in particular text messages, can present unique litigation challenges, and recent court decisions demonstrate that counsel must carefully balance what data should be preserved, collected, reviewed and produced, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • What CRA Deadline Means For Biden Admin. Rulemaking

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    With the 2024 election rapidly approaching, the Biden administration must race to finalize proposed agency actions within the next few weeks, or be exposed to the chance that the following Congress will overturn the rules under the Congressional Review Act, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Rebuttal

    Time For Congress To Let Qualified Older Pilots Keep Flying

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    While a previous Law360 guest article affirmed the current law requiring airline pilots to retire at age 65, the facts suggest that the pilots, their unions, the airlines and the flying public will all benefit if Congress allows experienced, medically qualified aviators to stay in the cockpit, say Allen Baker and Bo Ellis at Let Experienced Pilots Fly.

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