Wage & Hour

  • May 15, 2024

    Last-Mile Amazon Driver Does Interstate Work, Panel Says

    A driver for a logistics company who primarily made local deliveries for Amazon was engaged in interstate commerce and thus exempt from mandatory arbitration, a California appeals court has held, saying the worker's wage and hour claims can remain in state court.

  • May 15, 2024

    IT Recruiters Pursue Win Against Staffing Co. In OT Class Suit

    Recruiters for tech staffing company TEKsystems have asked a California federal judge to award them a pretrial win on their claim that the company misclassified them, saying recruiters are entry-level employees, not managers, so they don't qualify for the narrow exemption to California's overtime statute.

  • May 15, 2024

    Chemical Biz's Worker Numbers Can't Keep Wage Suit Federal

    A chemical company failed to show that more than 100 workers would be part of a proposed class in a suit claiming unpaid wages, a Pennsylvania federal judge ruled, sending the suit back to state court.

  • May 15, 2024

    Toss Of Bonus Bias Claim Too Short On Details, 5th Circ. Says

    The Fifth Circuit has reinstated a Hispanic salesman's claim that he was denied $160,000 in bonuses by a construction contractor out of racial bias after he was fired, ruling the lower court didn't adequately explain why it nixed that allegation.

  • May 15, 2024

    FedEx Contractor Wage Deal Needs Work, Judge Rules

    A California federal judge wouldn't sign off on a settlement for more than $33,000 between a FedEx contractor and delivery drivers to partly end a wage suit that named both FedEx and the contractor, telling the parties the terms lacked necessary information.

  • May 14, 2024

    Venable Opens Colo. Office With 8 Sherman & Howard Attys

    Venable LLP is growing its presence by opening its first office in Colorado, with eight commercial and employment attorneys from Sherman & Howard LLP opening its Denver location, which will be headed by partner-in-charge James "Jim" Sawtelle, the firm announced Tuesday.

  • May 14, 2024

    Conn. Retaliation Suit Advances After Justices' Title VII Ruling

    With a recent U.S. Supreme Court opinion said to be illuminating the path forward, a federal judge in Connecticut has declined to dismiss a case by a self-described former "high-level" employee of a private equity firm who alleges she was fired after raising concerns about her employer's treatment of women.

  • May 14, 2024

    Revised $2.25M Walmart OT Deal Fails For Lack Of Changes

    A California federal judge again refused to approve a $2.25 million deal between Walmart and 1,700 workers that would resolve an unpaid overtime lawsuit, finding that the modified agreement did not fix deficiencies the court had previously identified in the settlement's distribution method.

  • May 14, 2024

    Intervenors Can't Convince Appeals Court to Ax PAGA Deal

    A California state appeals court found that a trial court properly evaluated and approved a deal ending a Private Attorneys General Act lawsuit, disagreeing that intervenors were owed input in the case and rejecting the state labor department's assertion that the settlement was a "reverse auction."

  • May 14, 2024

    Domino's Operator Can't Arbitrate Car Reimbursement Suit

    The operator of Domino's Pizza franchise stores can't push into arbitration a driver's suit claiming under-reimbursement, a Tennessee federal judge ruled, saying the operator is not part of an arbitration pact the worker signed.

  • May 14, 2024

    Eli Lilly Can Challenge Collective Cert. Ruling In Age Bias Suit

    An Indiana federal judge said Eli Lilly & Co. can immediately appeal a decision certifying a collective in a suit accusing the pharmaceutical company of favoring millennials over older workers for promotions, agreeing that the Seventh Circuit should clarify the requirements for moving forward collectively.

  • May 14, 2024

    California Pot Worker's Suit Alleges Slurs, Unpaid Overtime

    A former worker for a cannabis cultivator and distributor is suing his former employer in California state court, saying he was fired in retaliation for reporting a work environment rife with racial discrimination.

  • May 14, 2024

    Lyft Driver Urges Justices Not To Review PAGA Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court already made clear that state courts "have the last word" on the arbitration fate of nonindividual Private Attorneys General Act claims, a Lyft driver said, saying there's no need for the justices to weigh in on his misclassification case.

  • May 14, 2024

    DOL Scores Order To Stop Diner From Intimidating Workers

    An Indiana diner must stop retaliating against workers cooperating with a U.S. Department of Labor probe into its pay practices after a federal judge granted the agency's request for an injunction.

  • May 14, 2024

    DoorDash's $664K Misclassification Deal Gets Final Approval

    A California federal judge gave the final sign-off on a $664,000 settlement ending claims that DoorDash misclassified delivery drivers as independent contractors and failed to pay minimum wage, finding the terms to be a fair resolution of the dispute.

  • May 13, 2024

    Driver Asks For Discovery Greenlight After 6th Circ. Ruling

    A driver for a Domino's franchisee told an Ohio federal court his suit claiming under-reimbursement for vehicle-related expenses should proceed normally after the Sixth Circuit weighed in, saying the appellate court's decision doesn't lead to a different way forward.

  • May 13, 2024

    Calif. Hyatt's $725K Wage Deal Scores Final OK

    A California federal judge Monday placed the final stamp of approval on a $725,000 deal resolving over 600 workers' wage claims against Hyatt, finding the terms to be a reasonable resolution, but trimmed the workers' attorney fees award because the case didn't warrant a larger-than-usual award.

  • May 13, 2024

    DOL Says Policy Disagreement Not Enough To Nix H-2A Rule

    The U.S. Department of Labor rejected a group of farms' criticisms of new H-2A agricultural wages as a mere policy disagreement, telling a North Carolina federal court that the rule was appropriately enacted after taking stock of its potential financial effects.

  • May 13, 2024

    NJ Justices Hold Contract Supersedes Real Estate Wage Law

    The contract a real estate agent signed deeming him an independent contractor is enough to resolve his claims of improper wage deductions, the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled Monday, saying that a state three-prong test doesn't need to apply.

  • May 13, 2024

    Popeye's Franchisee, DOL End Probe Interference Suit

    A Popeye's franchisee and one of its managers will end a U.S. Department of Labor suit in Pennsylvania federal court claiming they lied to and threatened department investigators, after a federal judge approved a deal Monday.

  • May 13, 2024

    Ex-Raleigh Cop Wants OT Suit Kept Alive

    An ex-police officer accusing the City of Raleigh, North Carolina, of forcing its officers to accept time off instead of overtime urged a federal court to deny the city's request to toss the suit, saying the city should be held accountable for failing to pay overtime.

  • May 13, 2024

    Workers Want $775K In Atty Fees After Multistate Wage Verdict

    An attorney who secured a six-figure judgment in a multistate wage class action against an Apple-affiliated repair company has asked for more than $775,000 in fees, citing her opponents' "aggressive" litigation tactics and the significant risk she incurred in taking on the case.

  • May 13, 2024

    Uber, Lyft Put Driver Work Fight In Reverse As Trial Begins

    A high-stakes battle over the employment status of drivers for Uber and Lyft kicked off in Massachusetts on Monday, as the companies sought to flip the government allegations by arguing that the ride-hailing giants work for their drivers, not the other way around.

  • May 13, 2024

    Rail Worker Wage Case Won't Get High Court Review

    The U.S. Supreme Court won't intervene in a pending Massachusetts lawsuit against the operator of a freight rail line over whether its employees are covered by the state's Prevailing Wage Act, declining Monday to review the case.

  • May 13, 2024

    Ind. Home Health Co. Pays $151K For OT Violations

    A home healthcare company in Indianapolis paid more than $151,000 in back wages and damages for denying 32 workers overtime rates, the U.S. Department of Labor announced.

Expert Analysis

  • How ESG Is Taking Women's Soccer To The Next Level

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    Several elite soccer teams sharpened their competitive edges for the 2023 Women's World Cup by focusing on environmental, social and governance issues at home, demonstrating that many industries can use the principles of ESG investing to identify opportunities to increase growth, improve performance and address stakeholders' desires, say attorneys at ArentFox Schiff.

  • How Int'l Strategies Can Mitigate US Child Labor Risks

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    Recent reports of child labor in the U.S. raise significant compliance concerns under state and federal child labor laws, but international business and human rights principles provide tools companies can use to identify, mitigate and remediate the risks, says Tom Plotkin at Covington.

  • 2nd Circ. OT Ruling Guides On Pay For Off-The-Clock Work

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    While the Second Circuit’s recent holding in Perry v. City of New York reiterated that the Fair Labor Standards Act obligates employers to pay overtime for off-the-clock work, it recognized circumstances, such as an employee’s failure to report, that allow an employer to disclaim the knowledge element that triggers this obligation, say Robert Whitman and Kyle Winnick at Seyfarth.

  • FLSA Ruling Highlights Time Compensability Under State Law

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    While the Third Circuit's August decision in Tyger v. Precision Drilling endorsed the prevailing standard among federal courts regarding time compensability under the Fair Labor Standards Act, it also serves as a reminder that state laws will often find a broader range of activities to be compensable, say Ryan Warden and Craig Long at White and Williams.

  • Understanding Wage Theft Penalties Under New NY Statute

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    Under a recently enacted New York statute, wage theft is considered a form of larceny under the state's penal law, and prosecutors can seek even stronger penalties against violators — so all employers are well advised to pay close and careful attention to compliance with their wage payment obligations, say Paxton Moore and Robert Whitman at Seyfarth.

  • How To Create A California-Compliant Piece-Rate Pay Policy

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    Piece-rate compensation can encourage worker efficiency and productivity, but California has special rules for employers that use this type of pay plan, so careful execution and clear communication with employees is essential for maintaining compliance, says Ashley Paynter at Riley Safer.

  • 3 Employer Considerations In Light Of DOL Proposed OT Rule

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    A recently unveiled rule from the U.S. Department of Labor would increase the salary threshold for Fair Labor Standards Act overtime exemptions, and while the planned changes are not the law just yet, employers should start thinking about the best ways to position their organizations for compliance in the future, say Brodie Erwin and Sarah Spangenburg at Kilpatrick.

  • Prevailing Wage Rules Complicate Inflation Act Tax Incentives

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    Nicole Elliott and Timothy Taylor at Holland & Knight discuss the intersection between tax and labor newly created by the Inflation Reduction Act, and focus on aspects of recent U.S. Department of Labor and U.S. Department of the Treasury rules that may catch tax-incentive seekers off guard.

  • Calif., Wash. Rest Break Waivers: What Carriers Must Know

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    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's recent invitation for petitions to waive its rules on meal and rest breaks for commercial drivers in California and Washington is an unusual move, and the agency's own guidance seems to acknowledge that its plan may face legal challenges, says Jessica Scott at Wheeler Trigg.

  • Eye On Compliance: Women's Soccer Puts Equal Pay In Focus

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    As the U.S. Women's National Team returns from World Cup, employers can honor the fighting spirit of the athletes — which won them a historic gender pay equality settlement in 2022 — by reviewing federal equal pay compliance requirements and committing to a level playing field for all genders, says Christina Heischmidt at Wilson Elser.

  • How New Illinois Child Influencer Law Affects Advertisers

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    Although Illinois' recently amended child labor law puts the burden on vloggers to ensure minors under the age of 16 featured in online videos are properly compensated, lack of compliance could reflect negatively on advertisers by association, say Monique Bhargava and Edward Fultz at Reed Smith.

  • Lessons On Using 'Advice Of Counsel' Defense In FLSA Suits

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    Several Fair Labor Standards Act cases illustrate the dangers inherent in employers trying to use the advice-of-counsel defense as a shield against liability while attempting to guard attorney-client privilege over relevant communications, says Mark Tabakman at Fox Rothschild.

  • DC Circ. Ruling Puts Issue Class Cert. Under Microscope

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    The D.C. Circuit's recent Harris v. Medical Transportation Management decision, which pushed back against lax application of Rule 23(c)(4) to certify issue classes as an end-run around the predominance requirement, provides potentially persuasive fodder for seeking to limit the scope of issue classes in other circuits, say attorneys at Skadden.