Corporate

  • February 23, 2024

    Employment Authority: Alito's Defense Of Christian Jurors

    Law360 Employment Authority covers the biggest employment cases and trends. Catch up this week with coverage on how Justice Samuel Alito's criticism following the dismissal of Christian jurors from a sexual orientation bias suit is dividing legal experts, why attorneys are encouraging employers to turn to state arbitration law as the U.S. Supreme Court weighs a carveout for the Federal Arbitration Act and how workers and employers are compromising following the National Labor Relations Board's severance holding.

  • February 23, 2024

    Balloon Co. Blew Up Appeal Of Fraud Verdict, 1st Circ. Says

    A bid from the owner of a defunct balloon company to set aside an already-reduced jury award won't fly, the First Circuit has concluded, finding that the company's own acknowledgment about transferred funds "dooms their appeal."

  • February 23, 2024

    Co. Saddled Retirement Plan With Mediocre Funds, Suit Says

    SAS Institute Inc. cost workers millions in savings by failing to trim underperforming investment funds from its $3.6 billion retirement plan, according to a proposed class action filed against the software analytics giant in North Carolina federal court.

  • February 23, 2024

    Walgreens Investors Near Deal In Suit Over Opioid Epidemic

    An Illinois federal judge agreed Friday to maintain a stay in a stockholder derivative suit accusing Walgreens and its leadership of failing to limit retail pharmacies from dispensing unreasonable amounts of opioids, a day after the parties announced an agreement in principle to resolve their dispute.

  • February 23, 2024

    NRA, LaPierre Found Liable For Misconduct In $6M Verdict

    A New York jury found Friday that the National Rifle Association, longtime CEO Wayne LaPierre and two other executives improperly used donor money, among other misconduct, ordering individual defendants to repay the gun rights group a total of $6.4 million.

  • February 23, 2024

    Binance Judge Says Greed Overtook Ethics, OKs $4.3B Plea

    A Washington federal judge signed off Friday on Binance's $4.3 billion plea deal on money laundering and bank fraud charges, saying from the bench that the cryptocurrency exchange's ethics violations could not be explained away by mere ignorance. 

  • February 23, 2024

    New 'Varsity Blues' Judge Should Hear Plea Redo, Parent Says

    A former television executive looking to have her guilty plea wiped out in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions case asked Friday for a different judge, arguing that U.S. District Judge Nathaniel M. Gorton's "incorrect" ruling is the basis for her motion to vacate her conviction.

  • February 23, 2024

    4 Trends Executive Compensation Attorneys Are Watching

    A Delaware Chancery judge's rejection of Elon Musk's $55 billion Tesla pay package shows how a court historically viewed as corporate-friendly may be shifting, one of several trends executive compensation experts told Law360 they're seeing. Here are four issues executive pay lawyers should have on their radar.

  • February 23, 2024

    US Gun Cos. Seek Time For Justices' Input On Mexico's Suit

    Gunmakers facing a recently revived lawsuit looking to hold them liable for firearms trafficking and cartel violence in Mexico on Friday asked a Boston federal judge to stand down and halt proceedings so the U.S. Supreme Court can have a chance to review the case.

  • February 23, 2024

    Del. SPAC Rulings Said To Weigh Against Super Group Case

    Attorneys for investors seeking damages after a special purpose acquisition company took Super Group Ltd., an online international gambling venture, public in a $4.75 billion deal in 2022 repeatedly pointed a Delaware vice chancellor on Friday to the Chancery Court's growing SPAC case law as reasons to keep their lawsuit alive.

  • February 23, 2024

    Reed Smith Names New Heads In Downtown LA, Century City

    Reed Smith LLP has named new managing partners at its two Los Angeles offices, with a longtime corporate attorney assuming control in the Century City office and a labor and employment attorney taking the reins in the downtown Los Angeles office.

  • February 23, 2024

    Insurance M&A Partner From Sidley Joins Kirkland

    Kirkland & Ellis LLP has added a corporate partner in its insurance transactions and regulatory and financial institutions practice groups, bringing on a former Sidley Austin LLP attorney who said he "couldn't be more excited" to join the firm's Chicago office.

  • February 23, 2024

    Quinn Emanuel Wins Bid To Lead Amazon Returns Case

    A Washington federal judge has tapped Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP to serve as interim class counsel in a proposed class action against Amazon regarding its return policies.

  • February 23, 2024

    GC Cheat Sheet: The Hottest Corporate News Of The Week

    A Texas federal judge has told the National Labor Relations Board to wait at least another two weeks to start enforcing a new rule making it harder for companies to prove they are not joint employers. And board audit committees are branching out beyond finance and into the general counsel's realm, overseeing risks related to cybersecurity, ESG and more.

  • February 23, 2024

    With Interest, Trump Now Owes $454M For NY Valuation Fraud

    Donald Trump owes New York state nearly a half billion dollars after a county clerk on Friday tacked on $99 million in interest linked to a $355 million judgment in the state attorney general's civil fraud case against the former president last week.

  • February 23, 2024

    Ex-Vitol Oil Trader Convicted On FCPA Rap

    Former Vitol Oil Group trader Javier Aguilar was convicted Friday of Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and money laundering violations, after nearly two months of trial over claims that he bribed officials in Ecuador and Mexico in order to win $500 million in business deals for the global energy and commodities company.

  • February 23, 2024

    OCC Names Acting Chief Counsel As Top Lawyer Nears Exit

    The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency said Friday that its chief counsel will soon depart, creating a vacancy that will be filled temporarily by an agency veteran until a permanent replacement is lined up.

  • February 23, 2024

    9th Circ. Won't Rethink Tossed Google $2B Ad Trespass Suit

    The Ninth Circuit said Thursday that it will not reconsider its decision to toss a proposed $2 billion class action against Google that claimed the ubiquitous search engine enriched itself through unauthorized advertising that trampled website owners' property.

  • February 23, 2024

    Red Sox Network Exec Says 18 Mos. Enough For Billing Fraud

    A former vice president with the network that broadcasts Boston Red Sox and Boston Bruins games argued Thursday that he should spend no more than 18 months in federal prison after a jury convicted him of bilking his former employer through a phony invoice scheme.

  • February 22, 2024

    Mastercard Faces Monopolization Claims Over Digital Tokens

    Mastercard has been stonewalling digital wallet startup OV Loop, refusing to provide needed tokens and thereby excluding OV Loop from the mobile payment services market, all part of Mastercard's effort to maintain its chokehold on payment processing and continue to charge supracompetitive fees on transactions, according to a suit filed Wednesday.

  • February 22, 2024

    CVS Says Redbox Won't Remove Kiosks Despite Expired Deal

    Pharmacy chain CVS filed a lawsuit against Redbox in Illinois state court Wednesday alleging the DVD rental company has refused to remove its kiosks from 10 CVS stores across the country after their deal expired, and is seeking over $424,000 in unpaid commissions and the removal of the kiosks.

  • February 22, 2024

    Ex-BP Exec's Husband Cops To $1.7M Insider Trading

    The husband of a former manager at British oil and gas company BP PLC on Thursday pled guilty to securities fraud in Texas federal court and agreed to forfeit the $1.7 million he made with the help of insider trading, the U.S. Department of Justice said Thursday.

  • February 22, 2024

    Ex-Vitol Trader Denies Knowing Of Bribes, As Trial Nears End

    Counsel for a former Vitol Group executive told a New York federal jury in closing arguments Thursday that his client wasn't aware of bribes being paid to officials in Ecuador and Mexico in order to obtain $500 million in state contracts, while a prosecutor insisted that the former oil trader was the linchpin to the corruption scheme.

  • February 22, 2024

    SEC Won't Force BofA To Act On ESG Critic's Proxy Proposal

    A division of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has said it wouldn't recommend enforcement action against Bank of America for excluding a climate-related shareholder request from its upcoming proxy statement, while the division rejected Pfizer's request to exclude a shareholder proposal on human rights from its proxy statement.

  • February 22, 2024

    Lawmakers Press Big Banks On Muslim Discrimination Claims

    A group of five Democratic lawmakers on Thursday pressured the leaders of JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America, Wells Fargo and Citibank for information on how they work to prevent discrimination in banking, pointing to media reports of "de-risking" practices that target Muslim Americans.

Expert Analysis

  • Del.'s Tesla Pay Takedown Tells Boards What Not To Do

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    The Delaware Chancery Court’s ruthless dissection of the Tesla board’s extreme departures from standard corporate governance in its January opinion striking down CEO Elon Musk’s $55 billion pay package offers a blow-by-blow guide to mistakes Delaware public companies can avoid when negotiating executive compensation, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • The Corporate Disclosure Tug-Of-War's Free Speech Issues

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    The continuing conflict over corporate disclosure requirements — highlighted by a lawsuit against Missouri's anti-ESG rules — has important implications not just for investors and regulated entities but also for broader questions about the scope of the First Amendment, say Colin Pohlman, and Jane Luxton and Paul Kisslinger at Lewis Brisbois.

  • Skirting Anti-Kickback Causation Standard Amid Circuit Split

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    Amid the federal circuit court split over the causation standard applicable to False Claims Act cases involving Anti-Kickback Statute violations, which the First Circuit will soon consider in U.S. v. Regeneron, litigators aiming to circumvent the heightened standard should contemplate certain strategies, say Matthew Modafferi and Terence Park at Frier Levitt.

  • Aviation Back On Course, But Keep Seat Belts Fastened

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    While the airline industry finally returned to profitability last year for the first time since the onset of COVID-19, and is poised for historic levels of traffic in 2024, supply chain problems and economic and geopolitical uncertainty persist — so more turbulence may lie ahead, say Kevin Lewis and Bart Biggers at Sidley.

  • Del. Dispatch: Clarification On Fiduciary Duties Of Controllers

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    The Delaware Chancery Court’s January opinion in a Sears Hometown and Outlet Stores' stockholder dispute — holding that a controlling stockholder owes the company and minority shareholders some fiduciary duties when selling shares or voting to change the status quo — suggests instances where investors opposing board decisions should tread carefully, say attorneys at Fried Frank.

  • FTC AI Inquiry Signals Intensified Focus On Emerging Tech

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    The Federal Trade Commission's recent inquiry into investments and partnerships between Big Tech companies and artificial intelligence startups appears to be directed at guiding future enforcement decisions in competition, privacy and consumer protection — and three principles discussed at a related tech summit give insight on the agency's approach, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • What Shareholder Approval Rule Changes Mean For Cos.

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission recently approved proposed rule changes to shareholder requirements by the New York Stock Exchange, an approval that will benefit listed companies in many ways, including by making it easier to raise capital from passive investors, say attorneys at Baker Botts.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Amazon's €32M Data Protection Fine Acts As Employer Caveat

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    The recent decision by French data privacy regulator CNIL to fine Amazon for excessive surveillance of its workers opens up a raft of potential employment law, data protection and breach of contract issues, and offers a clear warning that companies need coherent justification for monitoring employees, say Robert Smedley and William Richmond-Coggan at Freeths.

  • Expediting Psychedelics Approvals In The EU, UK, Australia

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    Accelerated pathways for regulatory approvals for psychedelic drugs in the European Union, U.K. and Australia is indispensable to facilitate a seamless advancement of treatments from the research environment to the consumer, say Kimberly Chew at Husch Blackwell, and Ana Dukic and Sabrina Ramkellawan at AxialBridge.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Brazil

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    Environmental, social and governance issues have increasingly translated into new legislation in Brazil since 2020, and in the wake of these recently enacted regulations, we are likely to see a growing number of legal disputes in the largest South American country related to ESG issues such as greenwashing if companies are not prepared to adequately adapt and comply, say attorneys at Mattos Filho.

  • Vagueness In Calif. Climate Law Makes Compliance Tricky

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    California's recently enacted Voluntary Carbon Market Disclosures Act requires companies making claims of carbon neutrality, or significant greenhouse gas emissions reductions, to disclose information supporting those claims — but vague and conflicting language in the statute poses multiple problems for businesses, say John Rousakis and Chris Bowman at O'Melveny.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • What Cos. Evaluating M&A Can Glean From Latest HSR Report

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    The recently released Hart-Scott-Rodino report for fiscal year 2022 helps unearth important data points for companies as they evaluate potential transactions, including that, despite a historically low enforcement rate, the number of actions exceeds the number of second requests for the first time in nearly 20 years, say Ryan Quillian and John Kendrick at Covington.

  • Employer Lessons From Nixed Calif. Arbitration Agreement

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    A California state appeals court’s recent decision to throw out an otherwise valid arbitration agreement, where an employee claimed a confusing electronic signature system led her to agree to unfair terms, should alert employers to scrutinize any waivers or signing procedures that may appear to unconscionably favor the company, say Guillermo Tello and Monique Eginli at Clark Hill.

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