Connecticut

  • May 15, 2024

    Bolt Financial Cancels $37M In Shares To End CEO Loan Suit

    Bolt Financial Inc. will cancel over $37 million in shares to settle a derivative suit against the company's board of directors that accuses its former CEO of purposely defaulting on a $30 million loan, according to a filing in Delaware's Court of Chancery.

  • May 15, 2024

    2nd Circ. Revives Removal Fight Over Judge's Lack Of Analysis

    An immigrant facing removal despite fearing a drug cartel's torture back home got another shot to fight deportation, after the Second Circuit ruled that an immigration judge didn't adequately explain why short shrift was given to the immigrant's expert witness.

  • May 15, 2024

    WWE Says $3M Deal Sends McMahon Sex Suit To Arbitration

    World Wrestling Entertainment Inc. is joining a bid by former CEO Vincent McMahon to send a suit from a woman accusing him and the organization of sex trafficking and harassment to arbitration, saying she agreed to and signed a $3 million separation agreement that includes an arbitration clause.

  • May 15, 2024

    Anthem Blue Cross Owes $3.8M For COVID Tests, Lab Says

    Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield of Connecticut should be forced to pay nearly $3.8 million for medical laboratory work, including COVID-19 tests, that the insurer either denied, underpaid or failed to acknowledge, according to a federal lawsuit by a New Jersey-based company with facilities in Pennsylvania.

  • May 15, 2024

    Insurer Wants Payback For Covering Theater Group Theft

    An insurance company has asked a Connecticut federal court to force a married couple to pay for coverage it granted a theater education group that it says was bilked out of nearly $588,000 by the pair via personal use of the nonprofit's funds.

  • May 15, 2024

    Mortgage Co.'s $2.4M Data Breach Settlement Gets Initial OK

    A Connecticut federal judge gave her initial sign-off to a $2.4 million settlement between mortgage firm Planet Home Lending LLC and a consolidated class of customers whose personal data, including their Social Security numbers, was exposed in a cyberattack.

  • May 14, 2024

    Conn. Retaliation Suit Advances After Justices' Title VII Ruling

    With a recent U.S. Supreme Court opinion said to be illuminating the path forward, a federal judge in Connecticut has declined to dismiss a case by a self-described former "high-level" employee of a private equity firm who alleges she was fired after raising concerns about her employer's treatment of women.

  • May 14, 2024

    Conn. Judge Guts $1.4M Yacht Damage Lawsuit

    Parsing the underlying laws of several states, a Connecticut federal judge has torpedoed half of a four-count complaint accusing a North Carolina boat dealer and a Tar Heel State trucking company of destroying a $750,000 yacht during a highway transport move through New Jersey.

  • May 14, 2024

    Aerospace Co. Hit With $450M Engine Parts Antitrust Suit

    RTX Corp. subsidiary Pratt & Whitney got hit with a $450 million antitrust lawsuit by a parts supplier who says the company and its Canadian arm are using illegal agreements to monopolize the aftermarket supply of their PT6 and PW100 turboprop engine components.

  • May 14, 2024

    Vince McMahon Calls Accuser Hypocritical In Arbitration Push

    Embattled World Wrestling Entertainment Inc. founder Vince McMahon has characterized a former employee's bid to strike his preliminary statement from her lawsuit as meritless hypocrisy, a move that comes roughly four months after she first lodged the shocking complaint against him alleging abuse and trafficking.

  • May 14, 2024

    Judge Nixes In-House Atty's $7.5M Suit Against Client's Estate

    A Connecticut federal judge has determined the $7.5 million vexatious litigation claims a onetime in-house counsel filed against the estate of a former client were served weeks too late, ending a nearly seven-year-old case.

  • May 13, 2024

    Wall Fraud Conviction Affirmed Despite Juror-Prosecutor Tie

    The Second Circuit on Monday affirmed the conviction of a Colorado man found to have siphoned online donations meant to fund a Southern border wall, saying the fact that a federal prosecutor had mentored a juror's daughter didn't warrant vacating the conviction.

  • May 13, 2024

    2nd Circ. Affirms Dismissal Of Bystolic Antitrust Suit

    The Second Circuit issued its first decision under the high court's Actavis "pay for delay" ruling on Monday, affirming the dismissal of a case alleging that an AbbVie predecessor delayed competition for its hypertension treatment Bystolic through deals with several generic makers.

  • May 13, 2024

    Kwok Trustee Seeks Expanded Role For BVI Law Firm

    The Chapter 11 trustee in Chinese exile Ho Wan Kwok's bankruptcy case has asked a Connecticut judge for permission to hire Harney Westwood and Riegels LP as Cayman Islands counsel, a move that would expand the firm's reach beyond its current status as British Virgin Islands counsel to the estate.

  • May 13, 2024

    2nd Circ. Won't Revive UBS Suit Over Disclosed Account Info

    The Second Circuit declined Monday to revive a couple's suit accusing UBS of fraudulently flagging an account to the Internal Revenue Service, finding that any alleged harm resulting from an audit would have been caused by the agency itself.

  • May 13, 2024

    Conn. AG Sues Altice Over 'Enhancement Fee'

    Cable and internet service provider Altice illegally earned millions of dollars by charging consumers a monthly $6 "network enhancement fee" and failed to clearly disclose internet speed restrictions in violation of state law, Connecticut Attorney General William M. Tong said in a state court lawsuit on Monday.

  • May 13, 2024

    Impending Conn. Judge Retirements Prompt Special Elections

    On Election Day this year, 24 Connecticut municipalities will hold special elections to complete the terms of probate judges who will be retiring over the next year, Gov. Ned Lamont's office said Monday.

  • May 10, 2024

    Ex-Conn. Investment Adviser Arrested In Fla. Over $4M Fraud

    A former Connecticut investment adviser who lives in Florida was arrested there on charges that he defrauded clients out of more than $4 million by using their money for personal expenses and to pay returns for other clients.

  • May 10, 2024

    2nd Circ. Says Subway Texts Don't Trigger Autodial Law

    A divided Second Circuit panel upheld the dismissal of a suit claiming that the sandwich chain Subway illegally spammed consumers' phones with automated texts, finding that a Connecticut federal judge was right in ruling that the marketing campaign didn't use an autodialer as defined by federal law.

  • May 10, 2024

    Conn. Court Upholds Diplomat's $582M Win Against Ex-Wife

    Connecticut's ban on lawsuits arising out of adultery does not invalidate a Kuwaiti diplomat's $582 million win in a case against his ex-wife, whom he accused of lying about the paternity of their children as part of a complex fraud, the state's intermediate-level appeals court ruled Friday.

  • May 10, 2024

    Engineering Firm Inks Latest Deal In Conn. No-Poach Suit

    Belcan Engineering Group LLC has reached a deal with a proposed class of aerospace workers who accused it of conspiring with a Raytheon Technologies Corp. subsidiary and others to restrict hiring through anti-competitive "no-poach" agreements, according to a notice filed in Connecticut federal court.

  • May 10, 2024

    Conn. Quarry Wants $1.3M For Attys After $9.5M Trial Win

    A Connecticut quarry that the town of East Haven was found to have shut down for political reasons should receive just under $1.3 million for its attorney fees after winning a constitutional challenge in federal court, the company said in a Friday filing.

  • May 09, 2024

    3M, Dupont Want Conn. AG's PFAS Suit To Stay In Fed. Court

    Stressing their work for the military, 3M Co. and several entities tied to what was once E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Co. have opposed a motion by the Connecticut Attorney General's Office to send a PFAS forever chemicals environmental pollution case back to state court.

  • May 09, 2024

    Making Borrower Contact Ex Was Reasonable, Court Told

    A Connecticut woman's lawsuit accusing her mortgage servicer of forcing her to get in touch with an abusive ex-partner must be dismissed because it doesn't properly state a claim for violation of the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, the company told a federal court Thursday.

  • May 09, 2024

    Conn. Atty Denies Blame For News Story About Willkie Partner

    A solo practitioner in Greenwich, Connecticut, denied blame on Thursday for having "concocted" an unflattering New York Post article that said a Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP partner and his wife were squatting in a Connecticut mansion during a heated legal battle with their landlord.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Whitewater Kayaking Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Whether it's seeing clients and their issues from a new perspective, or staying nimble in a moment of intense challenge, the lessons learned from whitewater kayaking transcend the rapids of a river and prepare attorneys for the courtroom and beyond, says Matthew Kent at Alston & Bird.

  • Navigating Kentucky's New Consumer Privacy Law

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    On April 4, Kentucky passed a new law that imposes obligations on affected businesses relating to the collection, use and sale of personal data — and those operating within the state must prepare for a new regulatory landscape governing the handling of consumer data, say Risa Boerner and Martha Vázquez at Fisher Phillips.

  • This Earth Day, Consider How Your Firm Can Go Greener

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    As Earth Day approaches, law firms and attorneys should consider adopting more sustainable practices to reduce their carbon footprint — from minimizing single-use plastics to purchasing carbon offsets for air travel — which ultimately can also reduce costs for clients, say M’Lynn Phillips and Lisa Walters at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • What Bankruptcy Deadline Appeal May Mean For Claimants

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    If the Third Circuit reverses a recent appeal made in In re: Promise Healthcare, litigation claimants within the circuit will not be able to rely on the proof of claim process to preserve the claim — but if the court affirms, the U.S. Supreme Court may need to step in to resolve the circuit split on this issue, say attorneys at DLA Piper.

  • Practicing Law With Parkinson's Disease

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    This Parkinson’s Awareness Month, Adam Siegler at Greenberg Traurig discusses his experience working as a lawyer with Parkinson’s disease, sharing both lessons on how to cope with a diagnosis and advice for supporting colleagues who live with the disease.

  • Series

    Playing Hockey Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Nearly a lifetime of playing hockey taught me the importance of avoiding burnout in all aspects of life, and the game ultimately ended up providing me with the balance I needed to maintain success in my legal career, says John Riccione at Taft.

  • For Lawyers, Pessimism Should Be A Job Skill, Not A Life Skill

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    A pessimistic mindset allows attorneys to be effective advocates for their clients, but it can come with serious costs for their personal well-being, so it’s crucial to exercise strategies that produce flexible optimism and connect lawyers with their core values, says Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Opinion

    Requiring Leave To File Amicus Briefs Is A Bad Idea

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    A proposal to amend the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure that would require parties to get court permission before filing federal amicus briefs would eliminate the long-standing practice of consent filing and thereby make the process less open and democratic, says Lawrence Ebner at the Atlantic Legal Foundation and DRI Center.

  • 4 Ways To Motivate Junior Attorneys To Bring Their Best

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    As Gen Z and younger millennial attorneys increasingly express dissatisfaction with their work and head for the exits, the lawyers who manage them must understand and attend to their needs and priorities to boost engagement and increase retention, says Stacey Schwartz at Katten.

  • Conn. Bankruptcy Ruling Furthers Limitation Extension Split

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    A recent Connecticut bankruptcy court decision further solidifies a split of authority on whether Bankruptcy Rule 9006(b) may be used to extend the limitations period, meaning practitioners seeking to extend should serve the motion on all applicable parties and, where possible, rely on the doctrine of equitable tolling, says Shane Ramsey at Nelson Mullins.

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • 2nd Circ. Adviser Liability Ruling May Shape SEC Enforcement

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    The Second Circuit’s recent decision in U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission v. Rashid, applying basic negligence principles to reverse a finding of investment adviser liability, provides a road map for future fraud enforcement proceedings, says Elisha Kobre at Bradley Arant.

  • Stay Interviews Are Key To Retaining Legal Talent

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    Even as the economy shifts and layoffs continue, law firms still want to retain their top attorneys, and so-called stay interviews — informal conversations with employees to identify potential issues before they lead to turnover — can be a crucial tool for improving retention and morale, say Tina Cohen Nicol and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • What To Know About State-Level Health Data Privacy Laws

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    Companies that handle consumer health data, including those in the retail sector, should take a conservative approach when interpreting the scope of new health privacy laws in Washington, Nevada and Connecticut, which may include development of privacy notices, consent procedures, rights request response processes and processor contracts, say attorneys at Hunton.

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