Aerospace & Defense

  • May 15, 2024

    Feds Tell Justices $3.1B Satellite Deal Isn't Reviewable

    The Biden administration has urged the U.S. Supreme Court against reviewing an order dismissing claims that a contractor was pushed out of a $3.1 billion military satellite deal, saying the transaction was a sovereign action shielded from court review.

  • May 15, 2024

    'Where's Bob?' Nowhere Near Wife's Gold Bars, Jury Hears

    Sen. Robert Menendez and his future wife weren't living together when an alleged bribery scheme took root six years ago and continued residing mostly apart after they married, he in Washington, D.C., and she in her New Jersey home that had a closet filled with gold bars and cash, jurors heard Wednesday.

  • May 15, 2024

    Senators Release 'Road Map' For Crafting Federal AI Policy

    A bipartisan group of senators on Wednesday laid out a "road map" for artificial intelligence policy that calls for increased AI innovation funding, testing of potential harms posed by AI and consideration of the technology's workforce implications.

  • May 14, 2024

    Magnets Co. Can't Trim Suit Despite Feds' PACER Accident

    The federal government's accidental posting of an unredacted expert report containing sensitive technical data doesn't warrant trimming the government's lawsuit accusing a magnetics manufacturer of sharing that same data with China, a Kentucky federal judge ruled Tuesday.

  • May 14, 2024

    Political Giants To Loom Over Sen. Menendez Trial

    A bipartisan bunch of political powerhouses may testify or be mentioned in the corruption trial of U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez, according to the list a New York federal judge read Tuesday to weed out potential jurors who may have relationships with the public figures.

  • May 14, 2024

    DOJ Says Boeing Violated 737 Max Deferred Prosecution Deal

    Boeing breached its deferred prosecution agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice stemming from the deadly 737 Max 8 crashes, but the government hasn't yet decided whether it will criminally prosecute the American aerospace giant for defrauding regulators, the DOJ said in a Texas federal court filing Tuesday.

  • May 14, 2024

    DC Circ. Affirms Toss Of Muslim Family's Airport Search Suit

    The D.C. Circuit on Tuesday upheld the dismissal of a Muslim family's lawsuit alleging they endured unconstitutionally intrusive treatment on an international trip that evinced they had been wrongly placed on a terrorist watchlist, finding that the lower court correctly leaned on a confidential declaration from an FBI agent in tossing the case.

  • May 14, 2024

    The PREP Immunity Question Won't Be Decided Yet

    The Federal Circuit opted Tuesday not to say whether a 2005 public health law provides any legal immunity in a patent dispute between rival manufacturers of COVID-19 test swabs, leaving the thorny question unanswered.

  • May 14, 2024

    Telecoms Settle FCC Probe Into Undersea Cables For $2M

    Two telecoms will pay $1 million each to resolve a Federal Communications Commission probe into an undersea cable system that connected the U.S. with Colombia and Costa Rica without FCC approval.

  • May 14, 2024

    Boeing Can't Beat Rival's Trade Secrets Claim, 11th Circ. Hints

    Counsel for Boeing attempted to convince the Eleventh Circuit on Tuesday that a rival aircraft company's bid to claim unjust enrichment amid a long-running U.S. Air Force contract fight should be barred by contract language that waived claims for damages stemming from Boeing's allegedly underhanded bidding tactics.

  • May 14, 2024

    NIST Finalizes Revised Security Guidelines For Sensitive Info

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology on Tuesday released a final version of revised guidelines for contractors and other entities who handle sensitive unclassified federal information, intended to clarify and streamline those requirements.

  • May 14, 2024

    Aerospace Co. Hit With $450M Engine Parts Antitrust Suit

    RTX Corp. subsidiary Pratt & Whitney got hit with a $450 million antitrust lawsuit by a parts supplier who says the company and its Canadian arm are using illegal agreements to monopolize the aftermarket supply of their PT6 and PW100 turboprop engine components.

  • May 14, 2024

    Biden Signs Bipartisan Russian Uranium Products Ban

    A ban on the import of Russian uranium will be phased in beginning in August, following U.S. President Joe Biden's signing of bipartisan legislation.

  • May 14, 2024

    Keep It Short, And Other Advice From Fed. Circ. Judges

    Six Federal Circuit judges counseled a packed room of attorneys on Tuesday about the most common ways to ruin their own cases, such as talking too much at oral argument, adding additional citations and attacking judges or opposing counsel.

  • May 13, 2024

    SEC, FinCEN Propose Money Manager Customer ID Rule

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the Treasury Department's Financial Crimes Enforcement Network on Monday proposed a rule that would require money managers such as hedge funds and private equity firms to document and maintain customer identification programs.

  • May 13, 2024

    SPAC Investor Says Insiders Overvalued Satellite Co. Deal

    An investor has sued a blank-check company and several of its top brass in Delaware Chancery Court, alleging the defendants protected their buy-ins while leaving public investors to suffer losses following a merger with satellite imaging company BlackSky Holdings Inc.

  • May 13, 2024

    Watchdog Nixes Bidder's Protest To Low $159M Air Force Deal

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office said an aviation company couldn't question the feasibility of a rival's $159 million U.S. Air Force flight training contract, when the service branch never indicated it would check if bidders' prices were realistic.

  • May 13, 2024

    Electric-Jet Startup Flouted Boeing Loan Deals, Judge Says

    A Washington state electric-jet startup breached its contracts with The Boeing Co. by not repaying $9 million in loans, a federal judge has ruled in an order rejecting an argument the loans were voided by the aviation giant's alleged theft of the startup's intellectual property.

  • May 13, 2024

    House Bill Seeks More Commerce Dept. Control Of AI Exports

    Technology companies may soon be required to implement security checks before collaborating with Chinese artificial intelligence labs with military ties, under a bipartisan bill introduced last week in the U.S. House of Representatives.

  • May 13, 2024

    Co. Says Typo Wrongly Cost It Shot At $10B Army IT Deal

    An information technology firm has urged the Court of Federal Claims to restore its eligibility for a pending $10 billion U.S. Army IT hardware procurement, saying the Army wrongly excluded the company for one missing word in its proposal.

  • May 13, 2024

    Camp Lejeune Plaintiffs Can't Appeal Jury Trial Denial Order

    The North Carolina federal court overseeing litigation over water contamination at the Camp Lejeune military base on Monday denied the service members' attempt to appeal an order that struck down their bid for jury trials, saying that it's not an issue that warrants appeal.

  • May 13, 2024

    White House Bars Real Estate Deal Near Air Force Base

    President Joe Biden is ordering a recent purchaser of real estate near an Air Force base in Wyoming to sell portions of the property, based on a public tip and a finding from the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States that cryptocurrency mining there presents a national security risk.

  • May 13, 2024

    'Gamesmanship' Lecture Launches Menendez Bribery Trial

    The corruption trial of U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez started Monday with a stern admonition from U.S. District Judge Sidney Stein after the government and defense lawyers squabbled over pretrial disclosures, and a message that the jury may be in for a long haul. 

  • May 10, 2024

    Congress Wants Microsoft Prez To Testify On Security Failures

    A congressional committee has asked Microsoft President Brad Smith to testify at a public hearing about the company's cybersecurity measures and response to recent successful attacks against government officials by Russian and Chinese hackers, according to a letter posted Friday on social media platform X.

  • May 10, 2024

    Navy Defends Retaining Contractor Facing Labor Unrest

    The U.S. Navy on Friday rebutted a Federal Circuit judge's suggestion that it might have turned "a blind eye" to a contractor's alleged labor law violations, saying it followed its obligations under procurement law to assess both performance and ethics.

Expert Analysis

  • Exploring Patent Trends In Aerospace Electrification

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    As blue-chip companies lead the charge to power large-scale commercial airplanes with electricity, and startups advance the trend on a regional scale, patent applications directed at improving energy storage and electric motor efficiency are on the rise, say attorneys at Finnegan.

  • What Minority Biz Law Ruling Could Mean For Private DEI

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    A Texas federal court’s recent decision to strike down key provisions of the Minority Business Development Act illustrates the wide-reaching effects of the U.S. Supreme Court's 2023 Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard decision across legal contexts, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Practicing Law With Parkinson's Disease

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    This Parkinson’s Awareness Month, Adam Siegler at Greenberg Traurig discusses his experience working as a lawyer with Parkinson’s disease, sharing both lessons on how to cope with a diagnosis and advice for supporting colleagues who live with the disease.

  • When Trade Secret Protection And Nat'l Security Converge

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    The Trump administration's anti-espionage program focused on China is over, but federal enforcement efforts to protect trade secrets and U.S. national security continue, and companies doing business in high-risk jurisdictions need to maintain their compliance programs to avoid the risk of being caught in the crosshairs of an investigation, say attorneys at Baker McKenzie.

  • Cos. Should Prepare For Foreign Data Transfer Regulations

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    A new regulatory regime designed to protect U.S. sensitive data from countries of concern may complicate an already intricate geopolitical landscape and affect even companies beyond the data industry, but with careful preparation, such companies can endeavor to minimize the effect on their business operations and ensure compliance, say David Plotinsky and Jiazhen Guo at Morgan Lewis.

  • Series

    Playing Hockey Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Nearly a lifetime of playing hockey taught me the importance of avoiding burnout in all aspects of life, and the game ultimately ended up providing me with the balance I needed to maintain success in my legal career, says John Riccione at Taft.

  • For Lawyers, Pessimism Should Be A Job Skill, Not A Life Skill

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    A pessimistic mindset allows attorneys to be effective advocates for their clients, but it can come with serious costs for their personal well-being, so it’s crucial to exercise strategies that produce flexible optimism and connect lawyers with their core values, says Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • How Export Controls Are Evolving To Address Tech Security

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    Recently proposed export control regulations from the U.S. Department of Commerce are an opportunity for stakeholders to help pioneer compliance for the increasing reliance on the use of outsourced technology service providers, say attorneys at Benesch.

  • Breaking Down The Latest National Security Tech Regulations

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    Companies all along the semiconductor value chain, across all industries and all geographies, should be mindful of the nature and extent of the highly complex, sweeping U.S. export controls, and how they can impact research and development, investment, production, and sales, say Brendan Saslow and Anthony Rapa at Blank Rome.

  • Opinion

    Requiring Leave To File Amicus Briefs Is A Bad Idea

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    A proposal to amend the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure that would require parties to get court permission before filing federal amicus briefs would eliminate the long-standing practice of consent filing and thereby make the process less open and democratic, says Lawrence Ebner at the Atlantic Legal Foundation and DRI Center.

  • 4 Ways To Motivate Junior Attorneys To Bring Their Best

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    As Gen Z and younger millennial attorneys increasingly express dissatisfaction with their work and head for the exits, the lawyers who manage them must understand and attend to their needs and priorities to boost engagement and increase retention, says Stacey Schwartz at Katten.

  • Defense Attys Must Prep For Imminent AI Crime Enforcement

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    Given recent statements by U.S. Department of Justice officials, white collar practitioners should expect to encounter artificial intelligence in federal criminal enforcement in the near term, even in pending cases, say Jarrod Schaeffer and Scott Glicksman at Abell Eskew.

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Nonprecedential, Unreasonable, Scope

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    James Tucker at MoFo examines three recent decisions showing that while the results of past competitions may inform bid strategy, they are not determinative; that an agency's award may be deemed unreasonable if it ignores available information; and that a protester may be right about an awardee's noncompliance but still lose.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

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